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THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    Late-1965 ad for Fantasy Masterpieces #3. "See the early work of Kirby, Ditko, Heck, Ayers and Sinnott! Prefaces by Stan Lee!"

    Late-1965 ad for Fantasy Masterpieces #3.

    "See the early work of Kirby, Ditko, Heck, Ayers and Sinnott! Prefaces by Stan Lee!"

    — 6 days ago with 42 notes
    #fantasy masterpieces  #jack kirby  #steve ditko  #don heck  #dick ayers  #joe sinnott  #stan lee  #house ad 
    S.H.I.E.L.D. Vs. The Horrors Of The Modern World
(Panels from STRANGE TALES #151, December 1966. Layouts by Jack Kirby. Illustrations by Jim Steranko. Words by Stan Lee. Lettering by Artie Simek.) Suddenly almost everything in the Marvel Universe was reaching some kind of critical juncture, a point of no return. Nick Fury’s modern-day S.H.I.E.L.D. adventures in Strange Tales merged with Captain America’s missions in Tales of Suspense as the heroes teamed against high-tech organizations like A.I.M. (Advanced Idea Mechanics) and HYDRA for a kind of sci-fi paramilitary feedback loop. Here, too, science bounded forward at a dizzying, almost alarming rate—even the flurry of good-guy gadgets like Life Model Decoys carried disconcerting post-atomic associations of that which humanity is not ready to harness. A.I.M.—which consisted of shady industrialists outfitted like futuristic beekeepers—created the Super-Adaptoid and brandished a talisman known as the Cosmic Cube (“The ultimate weapon! The ultimate source of power! The only such artifact known to man—which can convert thought waves—into material action!”), which fell into the hands of the Red Skull, who’d just reemerged from the rubble of the Führerbunker after two decades. All you could pray for was to have the Orion Missile, or the Matter Transmitter, on your side.
Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    S.H.I.E.L.D. Vs. The Horrors Of The Modern World

    (Panels from STRANGE TALES #151, December 1966. Layouts by Jack Kirby. Illustrations by Jim Steranko. Words by Stan Lee. Lettering by Artie Simek.)

    Suddenly almost everything in the Marvel Universe was reaching some kind of critical juncture, a point of no return. Nick Fury’s modern-day S.H.I.E.L.D. adventures in Strange Tales merged with Captain America’s missions in Tales of Suspense as the heroes teamed against high-tech organizations like A.I.M. (Advanced Idea Mechanics) and HYDRA for a kind of sci-fi paramilitary feedback loop.

    Here, too, science bounded forward at a dizzying, almost alarming rate—even the flurry of good-guy gadgets like Life Model Decoys carried disconcerting post-atomic associations of that which humanity is not ready to harness. A.I.M.—which consisted of shady industrialists outfitted like futuristic beekeepers—created the Super-Adaptoid and brandished a talisman known as the Cosmic Cube (“The ultimate weapon! The ultimate source of power! The only such artifact known to man—which can convert thought waves—into material action!”), which fell into the hands of the Red Skull, who’d just reemerged from the rubble of the Führerbunker after two decades.

    All you could pray for was to have the Orion Missile, or the Matter Transmitter, on your side.

    Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    (Source: seanhowe, via seanhowe)

    — 1 week ago with 66 notes
    #S.H.I.E.L.D.  #hydra  #nick fury  #captain america  #winter soldier  #cosmic cube  #jim steranko  #stan lee  #jack kirby  #artie simek 

    Over the weekend, author Saladin Ahmed posted images from the a story in The Eagle #2 (Fox Publications, 1941). I guess others have noted Spider-Queen and her web-shooting bracelets before, but I’d never even heard of the character.

    The Spider-Queen stories are credited to one Elsa Lisau. There seems to be an online consensus (no idea where it came from) that it’s a pseudonym for Louis and Arturo Cazeneuve.

    Bear with me for a moment while I backtrack to tell you about Cazeneuve.

    In 1940, Fox Publications editor Joe Simon gathered some of his colleagues to moonlight on a project with Martin Goodman’s Timely Comics (which would later become Marvel Comics). Red Raven #1 included an adventure starring the title character—a collaboration between Simon and Louis Cazeneuve—and two stories by Jack Kirby, in his Timely debut.

    Red Raven bombed—replaced on the schedule, I believe, by The Human Torch—and months later, Cazeneuve was still working for Fox, where Spider-Woman was published.

    But within a few months Simon and Kirby soon delivered a new hero and began working exclusively for Timely/Marvel.

    The hero, of course, was Captain America.









    — 1 week ago with 186 notes
    #golden age  #fox features syndicate  #spider-queen  #spider-man  #steve ditko  #jack kirby  #joe simon  #stan lee  #louis cazeneuve  #elsa lineau  #captain america  #silver spider  #harvey  #timely 
    HOW AN UNDERGROUND NEWSPAPER CHANGED MARVEL COMICS (part 1 of 4)
The following essay, by D.A. Latimer, appeared in the East Village Other in March, 1969.
Comics make a lot of money, they sell better than the Reader’s Digest, the Daily News, and Fiery Crashes Monthly put together. They have to make this kind of money, or else it wouldn’t be worthwhile publishing them at all—from the publisher’s standpoint, anyway. The trouble is, for the last fifteen years or so, they just haven’t been worth publishing from the reader’s standpoint. You see, back in the mid-fifties sometime, this very perverted cat named Dr. Frederic Wertham published one of the all-time great works of erotic fiction, under the guise of critical comment of comic books: he called it—now sit tight, fellow pedophiles—Seduction of the Innocent, larded it with carefully cropped, blown up, and retouched cartoon panels, and accompanied these with vast slobbering reams of pseudo-psychosexual case histories about sadists, arsonists, and father-rapers who had got that way from reading Little Lulu and Millie the Model. Wertham was a pornographer of the old school: he sold his thing to all these people who wouldn’t dream of jerking off like common perverts, and they became so inflamed with a sensation that they could only cool off by tromping on the comic book industry. And the industry became so uptight at the prospect of losing money that it commenced printing tripe—but tripe—and has done nothing of any account for the last decade and a half.
Lately, though, it appears that the permissiveness fostered by eight years of Democratic government has infiltrated even unto such as Stan Lee and Carmine Infantino, moguls of Marvel and DC Comics respectively. Comics over the last few years have been mincing apprehensively back into contact with the world, which is a most encouraging development for what McLuhan appropriately terms the coolest of all possible mediums. They need encouragement. And just to warn the Werthams of the world that social relevance does not necessarily entail depictions of graphic sexual activity, this week I’d like to sketch out a short history of The Token Negro In American Comic Books. For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll consider only DC and Marvel adventures comics. Archie Comics some while back dabbled uncomfortably with a brawny young hunk of black-haired beefcake called Angelo Angelino—he was Mr. Lodge’s groundskeeper for an issue or two—but they seem to have discontinued this disturbing element (which is pretty much alright, since it turns out, after their debut on television, that the Lodge family has a crackerish southern accent). And to go into an investigation, at this late date, of why the world of Mickey Mouse was kept carefully segregated from the world of Donald Duck, well, that would be disrespectful to the shade of Disney. So we’re hung with Marvel and DC, and we’ll dig Marvel first.
The only black character with anything like top billing in the Marvel lexicon is a cat named T’Challa, one of the Avengers. On a kind of sabbatical from the chieftainship of an African tribe called the Wakanda, T’Challa works with the Avengers in the guise of—now dig this—the Black Panther. No, no—while the Panthers have been around longer than T’Challa, the gentleman in no respect resembles Bobby Seale. He doesn’t even come off like Moms Mabely for Blackness, and he sure got nothing even in common with Jomo Kenyatta. You ever once hear a spade talk like this, outside of Othello: “If words were actions, rash one, I should long since have perished in my native Africa.” PVUNK! Another super-baddie bites the dust. Wakanda (not the river in Kesey’s Oregon, fool) is a super-city located in an artificial under the African veldt, and the Wakanda tribesmen are super-spades who run around in loincloths, toting stun-guns. Like I say, it’s encouraging to see comics coming back in touch with the world.
(Continued here.)

    HOW AN UNDERGROUND NEWSPAPER CHANGED MARVEL COMICS (part 1 of 4)

    The following essay, by D.A. Latimer, appeared in the East Village Other in March, 1969.

    Comics make a lot of money, they sell better than the Reader’s Digest, the Daily News, and Fiery Crashes Monthly put together. They have to make this kind of money, or else it wouldn’t be worthwhile publishing them at all—from the publisher’s standpoint, anyway. The trouble is, for the last fifteen years or so, they just haven’t been worth publishing from the reader’s standpoint. You see, back in the mid-fifties sometime, this very perverted cat named Dr. Frederic Wertham published one of the all-time great works of erotic fiction, under the guise of critical comment of comic books: he called it—now sit tight, fellow pedophiles—Seduction of the Innocent, larded it with carefully cropped, blown up, and retouched cartoon panels, and accompanied these with vast slobbering reams of pseudo-psychosexual case histories about sadists, arsonists, and father-rapers who had got that way from reading Little Lulu and Millie the Model. Wertham was a pornographer of the old school: he sold his thing to all these people who wouldn’t dream of jerking off like common perverts, and they became so inflamed with a sensation that they could only cool off by tromping on the comic book industry. And the industry became so uptight at the prospect of losing money that it commenced printing tripe—but tripe—and has done nothing of any account for the last decade and a half.

    Lately, though, it appears that the permissiveness fostered by eight years of Democratic government has infiltrated even unto such as Stan Lee and Carmine Infantino, moguls of Marvel and DC Comics respectively. Comics over the last few years have been mincing apprehensively back into contact with the world, which is a most encouraging development for what McLuhan appropriately terms the coolest of all possible mediums. They need encouragement. And just to warn the Werthams of the world that social relevance does not necessarily entail depictions of graphic sexual activity, this week I’d like to sketch out a short history of The Token Negro In American Comic Books. For the purposes of this discussion, we’ll consider only DC and Marvel adventures comics. Archie Comics some while back dabbled uncomfortably with a brawny young hunk of black-haired beefcake called Angelo Angelino—he was Mr. Lodge’s groundskeeper for an issue or two—but they seem to have discontinued this disturbing element (which is pretty much alright, since it turns out, after their debut on television, that the Lodge family has a crackerish southern accent). And to go into an investigation, at this late date, of why the world of Mickey Mouse was kept carefully segregated from the world of Donald Duck, well, that would be disrespectful to the shade of Disney. So we’re hung with Marvel and DC, and we’ll dig Marvel first.

    The only black character with anything like top billing in the Marvel lexicon is a cat named T’Challa, one of the Avengers. On a kind of sabbatical from the chieftainship of an African tribe called the Wakanda, T’Challa works with the Avengers in the guise of—now dig this—the Black Panther. No, no—while the Panthers have been around longer than T’Challa, the gentleman in no respect resembles Bobby Seale. He doesn’t even come off like Moms Mabely for Blackness, and he sure got nothing even in common with Jomo Kenyatta. You ever once hear a spade talk like this, outside of Othello: “If words were actions, rash one, I should long since have perished in my native Africa.” PVUNK! Another super-baddie bites the dust. Wakanda (not the river in Kesey’s Oregon, fool) is a super-city located in an artificial under the African veldt, and the Wakanda tribesmen are super-spades who run around in loincloths, toting stun-guns. Like I say, it’s encouraging to see comics coming back in touch with the world.

    (Continued here.)

    — 1 week ago with 149 notes
    #marvel comics  #black panther  #t'challa  #wakanda  #falcon  #stan lee  #jack kirby  #angelo angelino 

    Stan Lee dressed as Captain America, 1975
    Track down a copy of a May 1975 episode of the Mike Douglas Show and you’ll see George Carlin dressed as Spider-Man and Stan Lee dressed as Captain America. (You’ll also see Carlin mention that he wasn’t really a Marvel reader; he was more of an EC guy.)

    Lee still talks about how Carlin kept cutting off his answers.

    You’ll notice I don’t have a link to the video. Well, that’s because I’ve never seen it. I sure would like to, though! I’m throwing down the gauntlet—who can find it?


    — 1 week ago with 60 notes
    #george carlin  #stan lee  #batman  #captain america  #spider-man 
    Announcement for Daredevil letters page, 1964.

    Announcement for Daredevil letters page, 1964.

    — 2 weeks ago with 37 notes
    #joe orlando  #stan lee  #daredevil  #bill everett 
    Front page of StanLeeMedia.com, 1999:
Hello Future Investors!
You’ve probably been hearing a lot about Stan Lee Media in the news lately. The fun started when we launched stanlee.net, which features our unique online animated webisodes like the 7th Portal and The Accuser. Over three million fans downloaded the first webisode of the 7th Portalin the first month alone!

Things were just beginning to calm down around here when we unveiled The Backstreet Project, with my friends The Backstreet Boys. (Talk about frenzied fans! From all the fuss you’d think the Beatles had reunited!) Nick Carter, from the BSB, and I put our heads together and cooked up a great printed comic book that sold out as soon as the fans got wind of it. Next up, we did some amazing animation for the Backstreet Boys tour and we’re even going to be doing regular webisodes with the boys starting this summer!
Whew! And I thought things were hectic back when I was co-creating characters like The X-Men, Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk! The truth of the matter is that I don’t do all the work myself. I’m lucky to be collaborating with the brightest creative and technical talent from around the world, and we’ll continue using the Internet as a launching pad for all sorts of exciting new characters and series
Times change and so do Superheroes as you will see when I reinvent the DC universe of Superheroes. Our goal is to direct the destiny of all our new creations in all media, starting with the Internet. Thanks to our partners at IBM, we’ve built a digital animation studio that has the best convergence team in the world.
I guess the reason for all the fuss and attention from the press is due to the fact that what we’re doing here has never been done before. Everyone made a big fuss when fire and microwave popcorn were invented, so I guess I shouldn’t be so surprised. The thing I like best about all this is the opportunity to attract young generations of fans to the Superhero genre I love so well.
Take a look at stanlee.net to see what all the fuss is about!
All the best,

    Front page of StanLeeMedia.com, 1999:

    Hello Future Investors!

    You’ve probably been hearing a lot about Stan Lee Media in the news lately. The fun started when we launched stanlee.net, which features our unique online animated webisodes like the 7th Portal and The Accuser. Over three million fans downloaded the first webisode of the 7th Portalin the first month alone!

    Things were just beginning to calm down around here when we unveiled The Backstreet Project, with my friends The Backstreet Boys. (Talk about frenzied fans! From all the fuss you’d think the Beatles had reunited!) Nick Carter, from the BSB, and I put our heads together and cooked up a great printed comic book that sold out as soon as the fans got wind of it. Next up, we did some amazing animation for the Backstreet Boys tour and we’re even going to be doing regular webisodes with the boys starting this summer!

    Whew! And I thought things were hectic back when I was co-creating characters like The X-Men, Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk! The truth of the matter is that I don’t do all the work myself. I’m lucky to be collaborating with the brightest creative and technical talent from around the world, and we’ll continue using the Internet as a launching pad for all sorts of exciting new characters and series

    Times change and so do Superheroes as you will see when I reinvent the DC universe of Superheroes. Our goal is to direct the destiny of all our new creations in all media, starting with the Internet. Thanks to our partners at IBM, we’ve built a digital animation studio that has the best convergence team in the world.

    I guess the reason for all the fuss and attention from the press is due to the fact that what we’re doing here has never been done before. Everyone made a big fuss when fire and microwave popcorn were invented, so I guess I shouldn’t be so surprised. The thing I like best about all this is the opportunity to attract young generations of fans to the Superhero genre I love so well.

    Take a look at stanlee.net to see what all the fuss is about!

    All the best,

    — 2 weeks ago with 17 notes
    #stan lee  #peter paul 
    Detail from Amazing Spider-Man #32. Click here to enlarge.

    Detail from Amazing Spider-Man #32. Click here to enlarge.

    — 1 month ago with 24 notes
    #spider-man  #steve ditko  #stan lee  #original art 

    Spider-Man, Stan Lee, and the Green Goblin look on as a few kids with very, very interesting futures ahead of them—Nicky Bravin, Damon Liebowitz, and Jeremie Waterman—try to master the Atari 2600 Spider-Man game. 1982.

    Photo from Blip #2.

    — 1 month ago with 295 notes
    #spider-man  #stan lee  #green goblin  #atari 2600  #photos 
    The only surviving evidence of Stan Lee & Alain Resnais’ collaborations is this voiceover Lee provided for 1973’s L’AN 01.

    The only surviving evidence of Stan Lee & Alain Resnais’ collaborations is this voiceover Lee provided for 1973’s L’AN 01.

    — 1 month ago with 61 notes
    #alain resnais  #stan lee 
    From Journey Into Mystery #83.

    From Journey Into Mystery #83.

    — 2 months ago with 93 notes
    #thor  #jack kirby  #stan lee  #don blake 
    Peter Parker felled by altruism, 1962"Guilt is altruism’s stock in trade, and the inducing of guilt is its only means of self-perpetuation." —Ayn Rand, introduction to The Virtue of Selfishness, 1964

    Peter Parker felled by altruism, 1962

    "Guilt is altruism’s stock in trade, and the inducing of guilt is its only means of self-perpetuation."
    —Ayn Rand, introduction to The Virtue of Selfishness, 1964

    — 2 months ago with 185 notes
    #spider-man  #steve ditko  #stan lee  #ayn rand 
    Peter Parker embraces Objectivism, 1962 "Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal wlth one another must deal by trade and give value for value."—Ayn Rand, Anthem, 1937

    Peter Parker embraces Objectivism, 1962
     
    "Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal wlth one another must deal by trade and give value for value."
    —Ayn Rand, Anthem, 1937

    — 2 months ago with 191 notes
    #spider-man  #steve ditko  #stan lee  #ayn rand 
    The 1973 Bowling Green Comic Seminar, featuring Jeff Jones, Vaughn Bode, Berni Wrightson, and Stan Lee.(Image from eBay, via Ted Jalbert)

    The 1973 Bowling Green Comic Seminar, featuring Jeff Jones, Vaughn Bode, Berni Wrightson, and Stan Lee.(Image from eBay, via Ted Jalbert)

    — 2 months ago with 60 notes
    #comic conventions  #jeff jones  #vaughn bode  #berni wrightson  #stan lee  #posters