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THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    Jim Steranko’s Human Torch, Captain America, and Namor. Illustration for Marvel Masterpieces card set, 1993.

    Jim Steranko’s Human Torch, Captain America, and Namor. Illustration for Marvel Masterpieces card set, 1993.

    — 6 months ago with 196 notes
    #jim steranko  #human torch  #captain america  #namor  #sub-mariner 
    "The Fantastic Four Was The Great American Novel"  by Chris Tolworthy(Click here to enlarge)I don’t agree with everything here (and there’s a LOT to take in), but there can be no doubt that Chris Tolworthy has spent some time thinking about the FF.

    "The Fantastic Four Was The Great American Novel"  by Chris Tolworthy

    (Click here to enlarge)

    I don’t agree with everything here (and there’s a LOT to take in), but there can be no doubt that Chris Tolworthy has spent some time thinking about the FF.


    — 6 months ago with 148 notes
    #fantastic four  #reed richards  #sue storm  #the thing  #Human Torch  #ff  #jack kirby  #stan lee 
    House ad for Marvel Mystery Comics in the science fiction pulp magazine Marvel Stories #2, November 1940. Art by Carl Burgos.

    House ad for Marvel Mystery Comics in the science fiction pulp magazine Marvel Stories #2, November 1940. Art by Carl Burgos.

    — 7 months ago with 41 notes
    #Human Torch  #marvel mystery comics  #marvel comics  #carl burgos  #pulp  #pulps  #house ad  #ads 
    Human Torch in All-Winners Comics #1, Summer 1941. Art by Carl Burgos.

    Human Torch in All-Winners Comics #1, Summer 1941. Art by Carl Burgos.

    — 7 months ago with 27 notes
    #all-winners  #carl burgos  #human torch  #toro 

    This image captures a big moment: for the very first time, two Marvel heroes meet.

    From Marvel Mystery Comics #8, 1940.

    Was this a fictional universe at all? Wasn’t that the Manhattan skyline behind the Torch? Wasn’t that the Hudson River that the Sub-Mariner was diving into? Superman and Batman had smiled together on a few carefree covers, but every kid knew that they were fully tethered to their respective Metropolis and Gotham City, and that never the twain would meet. Who cared if the Acme Skyscraper fell, or the First National Bank had to give up its cash? Timely’s New York City, on the other hand, was rife with Real Stuff to Destroy. In Marvel Mystery Comics #8 and #9, which hit newsstands in the spring of 1940, Namor wreaks havoc on the Holland Tunnel, the Empire State Building, the Bronx Zoo, and the George Washington Bridge (“Hah! Another man-made monument!” he shouts, breathlessly aroused at the potential carnage) before the Human Torch finally confronts him, and the battle rages to the Statue of Liberty and Radio City Music Hall. Was it possible that they’d turn a corner and meet the Angel? Or, better yet, show up at the reader’s home?

    (Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story)

    — 11 months ago with 231 notes
    #sub-mariner  #human torch  #marvel mystery comics  #excerpts  #carl burgos 
    Human Torch #17, 1944. Art by Jimmy Thompson.

    Human Torch #17, 1944. Art by Jimmy Thompson.

    — 1 year ago with 12 notes
    #Human Torch  #Timely  #Jimmy Thompson 

    More greatness from artist Jimmy Thompson. From Human Torch #25, 1946.

    — 1 year ago with 30 notes
    #jimmy thompson  #human torch 
    Rich enthusiasts of jazz, beware!From Human Torch #32, 1948. Art by Mike Sekowsky.

    Rich enthusiasts of jazz, beware!

    From Human Torch #32, 1948. Art by Mike Sekowsky.

    — 1 year ago with 22 notes
    #Human Torch  #Timely  #Mike Sekowsky 
    Marvel Mystery Comics #48. Art by Harry Sahle. Or maybe Bil Keane.

    Marvel Mystery Comics #48. Art by Harry Sahle.

    Or maybe Bil Keane.

    — 1 year ago with 10 notes
    #marvel mystery comics  #human torch  #toro  #Harry Sahle 
    Marvel Mystery Comics #12. Art by Carl Burgos.

    Marvel Mystery Comics #12. Art by Carl Burgos.

    — 1 year ago with 22 notes
    #marvel mystery comics  #human torch  #carl burgos 
    The Tibetan threat, in Marvel Mystery Comics #14. Art by Carl Burgos.

    The Tibetan threat, in Marvel Mystery Comics #14. Art by Carl Burgos.

    — 1 year ago with 24 notes
    #Human Torch  #Timely