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THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    JACK KIRBY IN CONTEXT

    Two years ago, Jack Kirby’s granddaughter Jillian launched Kirby4Heroes, a campaign to raise funds for the Hero Initiative, which helps comic artists in need. On the Kirby4Heroes Facebook page, Jillian posted several vintage pictures of her grandfather.

    I thought it would be illuminating to provide a guide to what Kirby was working on at the time of each photo. Sometimes we forget that personal and professional lives don’t exist in vacuums.

    (1) July 1941: Only months after the introduction of Captain America, Kirby and Joe Simon would soon leave Timely Comics. Jack and Roz Kirby spent a day at Brighton Beach.

    (2) May 1961: Fantastic Four #1 was in development. It would hit newsstands on August 8. Bar Mitzvah for Neal Kirby.

    (3) December 1963. Avengers #4, featuring the return of Captain America, was on newsstands. Tales of Suspense #52, featuring the first appearance of Black Widow, was at the printers. The growing Kirby family celebrated Hanukkah.

    (4) July 1965: The debuts of the Inhumans (in Fantastic Four) and the Sentinels (in X-Men) were in production.

    (5) June 1966: The fully-Kirby-scripted S.H.I.E.L.D. story in Strange Tales #148 hit newsstands (along with all of these). “I [did] a little editing later, but it was [Jack’s] story.” Lee said in an interview. Neal Kirby graduated.

    On July 12, after Joe Simon began efforts to claim sole ownership of Captain America, Martin Goodman persuaded Jack Kirby to sign a deposition stating that Captain America, and all the work he’d done for Timely in the early 40s, was done with the understanding that it “belonged to Timely.”


    (You can read much more about this in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.)

    All images ©
    2013 by Connie, Neal and Jillian Kirby.

    — 3 weeks ago with 898 notes
    #JACK KIRBY  #x-men  #captain america  #fantastic four  #inhumans  #black widow 
    Menahem Golan, 1929-2014.
seanhowe:

Michael Winner, 1935-2013, Never Got To Make A Captain America Film For Cannon
December 16, 1985
 
Mr. Menahem Golan
CANNON FILMS
6464 Sunset Blvd.
Hollywood, California  90028
 
Dear Menahem:
 I thought I would write you concerning the Spider-Man script written by John Brancato and Ted Newsom, and the Captain America script written by Michael Winner and Stan Hey.
 The Spider-Man script, in my opinion, is superb.  It maintains the basic integrity of the character in the original story, while placing it in a modern setting.  It is simple and direct in its plot line and very easy for the reader to follow.  I have now read approximately twelve Spider-Man scripts or treatments, and this is by far the best of the lot!
The Captain America script, on the other hand, I found to be “bloody awful.”  It does not maintain the basic integrity of the character. It plays fast and loose with the basic storylines, and I found it to be so convoluted in its plot that I had difficulty following it.  In addition, I found the situation totally implausible, as it stretches credibility beyond the readers’ limit.  I certainly think it means going back to the drawing board again to get a more credible script.
 Best regards,
 
James E. Galton
President

    Menahem Golan, 1929-2014.

    seanhowe:

    Michael Winner, 1935-2013, Never Got To Make A Captain America Film For Cannon

    December 16, 1985

     

    Mr. Menahem Golan

    CANNON FILMS

    6464 Sunset Blvd.

    Hollywood, California  90028

     

    Dear Menahem:


    I thought I would write you concerning the Spider-Man script written by John Brancato and Ted Newsom, and the Captain America script written by Michael Winner and Stan Hey.


    The Spider-Man script, in my opinion, is superb.  It maintains the basic integrity of the character in the original story, while placing it in a modern setting.  It is simple and direct in its plot line and very easy for the reader to follow.  I have now read approximately twelve Spider-Man scripts or treatments, and this is by far the best of the lot!

    The Captain America script, on the other hand, I found to be “bloody awful.”  It does not maintain the basic integrity of the character. It plays fast and loose with the basic storylines, and I found it to be so convoluted in its plot that I had difficulty following it.  In addition, I found the situation totally implausible, as it stretches credibility beyond the readers’ limit.  I certainly think it means going back to the drawing board again to get a more credible script.


    Best regards,

     

    James E. Galton

    President

    — 1 month ago with 85 notes
    #cannon films  #captain america  #cannon  #menahem golan 
    seanhowe:

In 1985, Jack Kirby’s lawyer broached the subject of copyright claims for Spider-Man, the Hulk, and the Fantastic Four—after a Variety ad announcing Cannon Films’ planned Captain America film credited the character not to Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, but to Stan Lee.

    seanhowe:

    In 1985, Jack Kirby’s lawyer broached the subject of copyright claims for Spider-Man, the Hulk, and the Fantastic Four—after a Variety ad announcing Cannon Films’ planned Captain America film credited the character not to Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, but to Stan Lee.

    — 1 month ago with 217 notes
    #cannon films  #captain america 
    This may be the only way to reach some people.(via Village Voice commenter lamontcranberries)

    This may be the only way to reach some people.

    (via Village Voice commenter lamontcranberries)

    — 1 month ago with 81 notes
    #captain america  #village voice 
    JAZZ IS FOR SELLOUTS”Me play jazz? I’ll never do it—never! I’m an artist!”"Wow! What’s this? Varl has gone popular!”Marvel Mystery Comics #89, 1948. Art by Al Avison.

    JAZZ IS FOR SELLOUTS

    Me play jazz? I’ll never do it—never! I’m an artist!

    "Wow! What’s this? Varl has gone popular!

    Marvel Mystery Comics #89, 1948. Art by Al Avison.

    — 3 months ago with 169 notes
    #jazz  #al avison  #captain america  #timely  #marvel mystery comics 

    HOLLYWOOD, HOW DO YOU COME UP WITH SO MANY IDEAS?
    Iceman, Black Widow, Hercules, and Angel in Godzilla #3 (Marvel Comics, 1977)

    Godzilla (Warner Bros, 2014)
    Iceman in X-Men: Days of Future Past (Fox, 2014)
    Black Widow in Captain America: Winter Soldier (Marvel, 2014)
    Hercules (Paramount, 2014)

    — 3 months ago with 173 notes
    #godzilla  #x-men: days of future past  #x-men  #iceman  #black widow  #captain america  #winter soldier  #hercules  #champions  #marvel  #movies 
    Tales Of Suspense #83. Art by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers.Click here to enlarge.

    Tales Of Suspense #83. Art by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers.

    Click here to enlarge.

    — 4 months ago with 57 notes
    #dick ayers  #batroc  #captain america 
    Finally saw Captain America and... →

    timetokvetch:

    Everyone was right. It was a really decent movie. My brother goes to Bates College, so he asked me to wait to see it until he came down to Boston. We went to a matinee screening, so the theater was pretty empty and we could scream “Go, Joe!” as much as we wanted. We didn’t actually, but of course…

    Joe Simon’s granddaughter weighs in on Captain America: The Winter Soldier. (Spoiler: she liked the movie, did not like the buried Simon & Kirby credit.)

    — 5 months ago with 48 notes
    #joe simon  #jack kirby  #captain america 
    Captain America Comics #69.

    Captain America Comics #69.

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 44 notes
    #captain america 
    Rejected cover for Captain America #113 by Jim Steranko. The final version is here.

    Rejected cover for Captain America #113 by Jim Steranko. The final version is here.

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 2086 notes
    #captain america  #jim steranko 
    S.H.I.E.L.D. Vs. The Horrors Of The Modern World
(Panels from STRANGE TALES #151, December 1966. Layouts by Jack Kirby. Illustrations by Jim Steranko. Words by Stan Lee. Lettering by Artie Simek.) Suddenly almost everything in the Marvel Universe was reaching some kind of critical juncture, a point of no return. Nick Fury’s modern-day S.H.I.E.L.D. adventures in Strange Tales merged with Captain America’s missions in Tales of Suspense as the heroes teamed against high-tech organizations like A.I.M. (Advanced Idea Mechanics) and HYDRA for a kind of sci-fi paramilitary feedback loop. Here, too, science bounded forward at a dizzying, almost alarming rate—even the flurry of good-guy gadgets like Life Model Decoys carried disconcerting post-atomic associations of that which humanity is not ready to harness. A.I.M.—which consisted of shady industrialists outfitted like futuristic beekeepers—created the Super-Adaptoid and brandished a talisman known as the Cosmic Cube (“The ultimate weapon! The ultimate source of power! The only such artifact known to man—which can convert thought waves—into material action!”), which fell into the hands of the Red Skull, who’d just reemerged from the rubble of the Führerbunker after two decades. All you could pray for was to have the Orion Missile, or the Matter Transmitter, on your side.
Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    S.H.I.E.L.D. Vs. The Horrors Of The Modern World

    (Panels from STRANGE TALES #151, December 1966. Layouts by Jack Kirby. Illustrations by Jim Steranko. Words by Stan Lee. Lettering by Artie Simek.)

    Suddenly almost everything in the Marvel Universe was reaching some kind of critical juncture, a point of no return. Nick Fury’s modern-day S.H.I.E.L.D. adventures in Strange Tales merged with Captain America’s missions in Tales of Suspense as the heroes teamed against high-tech organizations like A.I.M. (Advanced Idea Mechanics) and HYDRA for a kind of sci-fi paramilitary feedback loop.

    Here, too, science bounded forward at a dizzying, almost alarming rate—even the flurry of good-guy gadgets like Life Model Decoys carried disconcerting post-atomic associations of that which humanity is not ready to harness. A.I.M.—which consisted of shady industrialists outfitted like futuristic beekeepers—created the Super-Adaptoid and brandished a talisman known as the Cosmic Cube (“The ultimate weapon! The ultimate source of power! The only such artifact known to man—which can convert thought waves—into material action!”), which fell into the hands of the Red Skull, who’d just reemerged from the rubble of the Führerbunker after two decades.

    All you could pray for was to have the Orion Missile, or the Matter Transmitter, on your side.

    Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    (Source: seanhowe, via seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 69 notes
    #S.H.I.E.L.D.  #hydra  #nick fury  #captain america  #winter soldier  #cosmic cube  #jim steranko  #stan lee  #jack kirby  #artie simek 

    Over the weekend, author Saladin Ahmed posted images from the a story in The Eagle #2 (Fox Publications, 1941). I guess others have noted Spider-Queen and her web-shooting bracelets before, but I’d never even heard of the character.

    The Spider-Queen stories are credited to one Elsa Lisau. There seems to be an online consensus (no idea where it came from) that it’s a pseudonym for Louis and Arturo Cazeneuve.

    Bear with me for a moment while I backtrack to tell you about Cazeneuve.

    In 1940, Fox Publications editor Joe Simon gathered some of his colleagues to moonlight on a project with Martin Goodman’s Timely Comics (which would later become Marvel Comics). Red Raven #1 included an adventure starring the title character—a collaboration between Simon and Louis Cazeneuve—and two stories by Jack Kirby, in his Timely debut.

    Red Raven bombed—replaced on the schedule, I believe, by The Human Torch—and months later, Cazeneuve was still working for Fox, where Spider-Woman was published.

    But within a few months Simon and Kirby soon delivered a new hero and began working exclusively for Timely/Marvel.

    The hero, of course, was Captain America.









    — 5 months ago with 203 notes
    #golden age  #fox features syndicate  #spider-queen  #spider-man  #steve ditko  #jack kirby  #joe simon  #stan lee  #louis cazeneuve  #elsa lineau  #captain america  #silver spider  #harvey  #timely 
    Marvel Two-in-One #3 (May 1974). Art by Sal Buscema. Words by Steve Gerber.The riskiest page in Marvel history?

    Marvel Two-in-One #3 (May 1974). Art by Sal Buscema. Words by Steve Gerber.

    The riskiest page in Marvel history?

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 74 notes
    #captain america  #steve gerber  #sal buscema  #race relations 
    Captain America meets Parliament-Funkadelic.

    Captain America meets Parliament-Funkadelic.

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 497 notes
    #captain america  #parliament  #funkadelic