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    The Man Who Colored The Marvel Universe:

    Stan Goldberg (1932-2014)

    Marvel colorist Stan Goldberg, who created the color schemes of the costumes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and dozens of others, died yesterday, at the age of 82. Mark Evanier has more information here.


    I wrote briefly, in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about two of Stan’s contributions to the Marvel mythos.

    On The Fantastic Four:

    And although they remained unmasked (in another break from comic-book convention, they were going to keep their identities public), at the urging of letter-writing fans they soon had snappy blue uniforms. “Jack gave them this long underwear with the letter ‘4’ on their chest,” said Stan Goldberg, who designed the color schemes of the Marvel comics. “I made the ‘4’ blue and kept a little area around it white, and then when the villains came in—the villains get the burnt umbers, dark greens, purples, grays, things like that—they can bounce off it.” The blast of colorful heroics against a murky background world immediately set Fantastic Four apart from everything else on the newsstand.

    On Spider-Man:

    The grand melodrama was offset by Lee’s snappy patter, Ditko’s stunning costume design, and, once again, the primary-color palette choices of Stan Goldberg, who selected for Spider-Man’s costume a combination of cherry red and dark cobalt (in deliberate contrast to the more vivacious azure of the Fantastic Four).

    ____

    Goldberg also drew non-superhero comics for Marvel in its Timely incarnation, and was the longtime artist for Marvel’s Millie the Model series. In the late 1960s he began drawing for various series published by Archie Comics.

    — 1 month ago with 166 notes
    #stan goldberg  #fantastic four  #x-men  #spider-man  #avengers  #hulk  #iron man  #thor 

    It’s Colorist Appreciation Day! Who are your favorite unsung Marvel colorists? Stan Goldberg, Marie Severin, Glynis Oliver…?

    And does anyone know what became of Petra Goldberg/Petra Scotese?

    — 8 months ago with 20 notes
    #colorist appreciation day  #stan goldberg  #marie severin  #petra goldberg  #glynis wein 

    "It’s — a Girl!" Love at First Sight for Clea and Doctor Strange

    From Strange Tales #126, November 1964. Art by Steve Ditko. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Letters by Artie Simek. Words by Stan Lee.

    — 9 months ago with 103 notes
    #strange tales  #steve ditko  #stan goldberg  #artie simek  #stan lee  #doctor strange  #clea  #4CP 

    The Man Who Colored The Marvel Universe

    Marvel colorist Stan Goldberg, who created the color schemes of the costumes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and dozens of others, is recovering from a car accident that he and his wife Pauline were in on November 19th. Pauline broke both arms and a leg; Stan suffered a fractured vertebrae.

    You can send cards to them at:

    North Shore University Hospital
    300 Community Dr, Manhasset, NY 11030

    I wrote briefly in Marvel Comics about two of Stan’s contributions to the Marvel mythos.

    On the Fantastic Four:

    "And although they remained unmasked (in another break from comic- book convention, they were going to keep their identities public), at the urging of letter-writing fans they soon had snappy blue uniforms. “Jack gave them this long underwear with the letter ‘4’ on their chest,” said Stan Goldberg, who designed the color schemes of the Marvel comics. “I made the ‘4’ blue and kept a little area around it white, and then when the villains came in—the villains get the burnt umbers, dark greens, purples, grays, things like that—they can bounce off it.” The blast of colorful heroics against a murky background world immediately set Fantastic Four apart from everything else on the newsstand.

    On Spider-Man:

    "The grand melodrama was offset by Lee’s snappy patter, Ditko’s stunning costume design, and, once again, the primary-color palette choices of Stan Goldberg, who selected for Spider-Man’s costume a combination of cherry red and dark cobalt (in deliberate contrast to the more vivacious azure of the Fantastic Four).

    Goldberg also drew non-superhero comics for Marvel in its Timely incarnation, and was the longtime artist for Marvel’s Millie the Model series. In the late 1960s he began drawing for various series published by Archie Comics.

    Wish Stan and Pauline well!

    — 10 months ago with 384 notes
    #Stan Goldberg 

    Captain America picked an especially disconcerting moment in history to reemerge. Avengers #4 was still in production on November 22, when news came that President Kennedy had been shot. “We were coming back from lunch, and people were listening to their car radios with the doors open,” Flo Steinberg remembered. “We didn’t have a television in the office, so everyone just sort of gravitated to a big room and sat around listening to the radio until they announced that he had died. We all left … just wandered.”

    Everyone, that is, but Stan Lee. “He was still working on the comic books,” noted Mario Puzo. “Like that was the most important thing in the world.”

    —From Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    — 11 months ago with 162 notes
    #avengers  #captain america  #flo steinberg  #mario puzo  #stan lee  #jack kirby  #stan goldberg  #joe simon  #jfk  #jfk assassination 
    "I remember the straw that broke the camel’s back. I had drawn a double-page spread in one of the Strange Tales sequences featuring Nick Fury on trial by Baron Strucker and the agents of HYDRA. I had something like a hundred figures in the background, all individual figures. I wrote a note to the colorist, Stan Goldberg, saying, "Stan, color all these men individually." Stan would probably put a sheet of blue over the whole thing, and that seemed criminal, because—although it might look good—after all I had done all that work putting in all those figures, I didn’t want them all obliterated. I took the story up to Marvel, and Stan looked at it and said, “I’ve had it, Steranko. Do it yourself. Take it away. I never want to see you again; just take the stuff away and color it yourself.” So I started coloring all my material at that time, at $2.00 per page; later it went to $3 per page. I could only color about ten pages a day, so you can see I was losing a lot of money. I could have just been penciling for two or three times as much; but the strip emerged a more perfect marriage of concepts as a result. So I was willing to take less money, by using that time to color and thereby make the story come out better.”—Jim Steranko to George Olshevsky, 1977

    "I remember the straw that broke the camel’s back. I had drawn a double-page spread in one of the Strange Tales sequences featuring Nick Fury on trial by Baron Strucker and the agents of HYDRA. I had something like a hundred figures in the background, all individual figures. I wrote a note to the colorist, Stan Goldberg, saying, "Stan, color all these men individually." Stan would probably put a sheet of blue over the whole thing, and that seemed criminal, because—although it might look good—after all I had done all that work putting in all those figures, I didn’t want them all obliterated.

    I took the story up to Marvel, and Stan looked at it and said, “I’ve had it, Steranko. Do it yourself. Take it away. I never want to see you again; just take the stuff away and color it yourself.” So I started coloring all my material at that time, at $2.00 per page; later it went to $3 per page. I could only color about ten pages a day, so you can see I was losing a lot of money. I could have just been penciling for two or three times as much; but the strip emerged a more perfect marriage of concepts as a result. So I was willing to take less money, by using that time to color and thereby make the story come out better.”

    —Jim Steranko to George Olshevsky, 1977

    — 1 year ago with 294 notes
    #Jim Steranko  #Stan Goldberg  #Nick Fury  #hydra 
    themarvelageofcomics:

Splash page from MODELING WITH MILLIE #50 by Stan Goldberg.

"Folk-Rock Fun House"!

    themarvelageofcomics:

    Splash page from MODELING WITH MILLIE #50 by Stan Goldberg.

    "Folk-Rock Fun House"!

    — 1 year ago with 70 notes
    #millie the model  #Stan Goldberg 
    From left: Chili, Stan Lee, Stan Goldberg.

    From left: Chili, Stan Lee, Stan Goldberg.

    — 1 year ago with 80 notes
    #Chili  #Stan Lee  #Stan Goldberg 
    THE CAT #3, April 1973. Art by Paty and Bill Everett. Words by Linda Fite. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Lettering by Jean Izzo.

    THE CAT #3, April 1973. Art by Paty and Bill Everett. Words by Linda Fite. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Lettering by Jean Izzo.

    — 2 years ago with 22 notes
    #The Cat  #Tigra  #Paty  #Bill Everett  #Linda Fite  #Jean Izzo  #Stan Goldberg 
    Groovy Get-Ups For Toni. From Millie the Model #201, April 1973. Art by Stan Goldberg.

    Groovy Get-Ups For Toni. From Millie the Model #201, April 1973. Art by Stan Goldberg.

    — 2 years ago with 21 notes
    #Millie the Model  #Fashion  #Stan Goldberg  #Whoa 
    From a 1969 X-MEN letters column, here’s a revelatory glimpse into who was coloring the artwork in Marvel’s comics.

    From a 1969 X-MEN letters column, here’s a revelatory glimpse into who was coloring the artwork in Marvel’s comics.

    — 2 years ago with 201 notes
    #x-men  #letters  #marvel  #comics  #Stan Goldberg  #Marie Severin  #Neal Adams  #Sam Grainger  #Sharon Cohen  #Michele Robinson  #Paul Reinman  #Bill Everett 
    From Millie the Model #107, March 1962. Art by Stan Goldberg. Words by Stan Lee.

    From Millie the Model #107, March 1962. Art by Stan Goldberg. Words by Stan Lee.

    — 2 years ago with 77 notes
    #millie the model  #stan goldberg  #stan lee 
    Adventure into Fear #19, December 1973. Art by Val Mayerik and Sal Trapani. Words by Steve Gerber. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Lettering by Artie Simek.

    Adventure into Fear #19, December 1973. Art by Val Mayerik and Sal Trapani. Words by Steve Gerber. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Lettering by Artie Simek.

    — 2 years ago with 21 notes
    #comics  #adventure into fear  #val mayerik  #sal trapani  #steve gerber  #stan goldberg  #artie simek  #peanut butter 
    "If all goes well, we’ll return in twenty-four hours!" Fantastic Four #19. Art by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Words by Stan Lee.

    "If all goes well, we’ll return in twenty-four hours!"
    Fantastic Four #19. Art by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers. Colors by Stan Goldberg. Words by Stan Lee.

    — 2 years ago with 8 notes
    #comics  #fantastic four  #jack kirby  #dick ayers  #stan goldberg  #stan lee  #4CP