Showing posts tagged Letters.
x

THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


Go to SEANHOWE.COM to purchase a copy of the book, now in paperback, or to read a chapter for free ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    STEVE ERICKSON is the author of nine novels: Days Between Stations, Rubicon Beach, Tours of the Black Clock, Arc d’X, Amnesiascope, The Sea Came in at Midnight, Our Ecstatic Days, Zeroville and These Dreams of You. He also has written two books about American politics and popular culture, Leap Year and American Nomad. Numerous editions have been published in English, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Dutch, Polish, Greek, Russian and Japanese. Over the years he has written for Esquire, Rolling Stone, Conjunctions, Salon, the L.A. Weekly, the New York Times Magazine and other publications and journals, and his work has been widely anthologized. Currently he is the film critic for Los Angeles magazine, writes a blog for American Prospect, and is editor of the literary journal Black Clock, which is published by the California Institute of the Arts where he teaches writing. He has received the American Academy of Arts and Letters award in literature, a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and twice has been nominated for the National Magazine Award for criticism and commentary.

    STEVE ERICKSON is the author of nine novels: Days Between Stations, Rubicon Beach, Tours of the Black Clock, Arc d’X, Amnesiascope, The Sea Came in at Midnight, Our Ecstatic Days, Zeroville and These Dreams of You. He also has written two books about American politics and popular culture, Leap Year and American Nomad. Numerous editions have been published in English, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Dutch, Polish, Greek, Russian and Japanese. Over the years he has written for Esquire, Rolling Stone, Conjunctions, Salon, the L.A. Weekly, the New York Times Magazine and other publications and journals, and his work has been widely anthologized. Currently he is the film critic for Los Angeles magazine, writes a blog for American Prospect, and is editor of the literary journal Black Clock, which is published by the California Institute of the Arts where he teaches writing. He has received the American Academy of Arts and Letters award in literature, a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and twice has been nominated for the National Magazine Award for criticism and commentary.

    — 2 months ago with 54 notes
    #steve erickson  #letters  #stan lee  #jack kirby 

    Stan Lee Planned to Make A Cartoon With Captain Kangaroo and Captain America in 1981

    "If time permits, it might be fun to have you doing an exercise with Cap—still in animation, of course."

    Captain Kangaroo, aka Bob Keeshan, suffered a massive heart attack only weeks after this letter was sent. Marvel sent the card pictured here.

    — 4 months ago with 176 notes
    #captain kangaroo  #captain america  #stan lee  #bob keeshan  #letters 

    The First Time Jim Shooter Joined Marvel (Sort Of)
    "When Stan started his Marvel fan club, the ‘Merry Marvel Marching Society,’ I couldn’t resist joining to see what came in the membership kit," former Marvel EIC Jim Shooter has written. “Stupidly, I used my own name. Later, when Stan announced that he was going to print the name of every single M.M.M.S. member in the comics, for months I lived in fear that Mort would spot my name and fire me.”

    He probably didn’t need to worry—I’ve been keeping an eye out for this for a few years, and only recently did I find it. (In Marvel Tales #7, March 1967)

    — 5 months ago with 52 notes
    #jim shooter  #merry marvel marching society  #letters  #mmms 
    seanhowe:

James Wolcott, Q.N.S. (Quite ‘Nuff Sayer)
Wolcott reflects on his letter-writing days:http://www.vanityfair.com/online/wolcott/2010/07/the-greatest-archeological-find-of-the-century

In light of recent Howard Kurtz revelations, I thought it was important to repost this.

    seanhowe:

    James Wolcott, Q.N.S. (Quite ‘Nuff Sayer)


    Wolcott reflects on his letter-writing days:
    http://www.vanityfair.com/online/wolcott/2010/07/the-greatest-archeological-find-of-the-century

    In light of recent Howard Kurtz revelations, I thought it was important to repost this.

    — 5 months ago with 75 notes
    #james wolcott  #letters  #fantastic four 

    This explains the longstanding Howard Kurtz/J. Jonah Jameson feud.

    — 5 months ago with 39 notes
    #spider-man  #letters  #howard kurtz  #fox news 

    "Sorry; not too many early ones, Lewis"

    —Marvel Comics letter from December 1965, explaining which back issues are no longer available for 25 cents.


    — 5 months ago with 76 notes
    #letters 

    Three Marvel rejection letters and one assignment letter to Jim Lee, plus one letter of response—”Will this story ever be published or is it just a try-out story?”—from 1986–87, recently posted by Lee on Instagram.

    You can read more about Jim Lee and Carl Potts here.

    — 5 months ago with 567 notes
    #Jim Lee  #letters  #Howard Mackie  #Eliot R. Brown  #carl potts  #alpha flight  #image 

    Producer to Stan Lee in 1975:

    Maybe Elton John or Mick Jagger Should Play Spider-Man


    Here’s a letter that producer Steve Krantz wrote to Stan Lee in 1975, giving his best pitch as to why Elton John and Mick Jagger could play the wall-crawler: “In the comic books, Spider-Man doesn’t sing or tap dance, so I think we can depart from comic book reality and cast him from the best standpoint of a musical fantasy picture.”

    Krantz goes on to indicate that he’d love for Lee to write story ideas/treatments, and that maybe in the future he’d want to move to Hollywood. (Spoiler: he would!)

    In the Some Things Never Change Department: “We will undoubtedly have the most orthodox complain bitterly about the casting, even if we played it as a straight action adventure.”

    — 6 months ago with 93 notes
    #stan lee  #spider-man  #movies  #steve krantz  #elton john  #mick jagger  #letters  #robert lawrence 

    Letter from 1966 Marvel Comics staffer to fan:
    Jack Kirby “plots the story as he draws it”; Marvel’s “whole operation is based on the story instinct” of Stan Lee


    Marvel Comics: The Untold Story is out in paperback this week; oh, how I wish I’d come across this amazing letter in time to include mention of it in the book. It’s a February 1966 letter from then-Staff Writer Denny O’Neil to Marvel fan Jay DeNatale, and it includes what’s possibly the earliest insider account of Marvel from someone other than Stan Lee.

    The course of events that led to Fantastic Four #1 that presented here are pretty much in keeping with the Stan Lee/company line, but the amount of credit O’Neil gives to Kirby for plotting—right down to the story beats in the margins of the pages—is notable.

    Among the other fascinating bits:

    • “Mr. Goodman insists that we keep sketches and editorial comments for reference and reprint.”

    • “Currently a Captain America pilot film is being shot in an animation process similar to that used by Hanna-Barbara”

    • “A producer named Robert Kranz [sic] is interested in the live television rights to several Marvel heroes” [Note: Robert Lawrence and Steve Krantz were both involved in the animated ‘Marvel Super Heroes’ series. Was a deal ever made for live-action series?]

    • There’s no mention of the recently departed Steve Ditko.

    As if all that weren’t enough, O’Neil included with his latter a Xerox of Jack Kirby’s pencils for Fantastic Four #47. (You can compare this to the inked, colored, and lettered page here.)

    — 6 months ago with 241 notes
    #Marvel Comics  #letters  #Denny O'Neil  #stan lee  #jack kirby  #fantastic four  #original art  #triton  #inhumans  #steve ditko  #martin goodman  #grantray lawrence  #steve krantz 

    themarvelageofcomics:

    A letter written by Stan Lee to super-fan Dr. Jerry Bails at the very beginning of 1963, discussing, among other things, the artwork on a recent Thor story, the impending debut of Dr. Strange, and the reasons for introducing The Wasp in the Ant-Man feature.

    — 6 months ago with 114 notes
    #stan lee  #jerry bails  #letters 
    Letter from Stan Lee to Jerry Bails, 1961. This letter was written only a few weeks after Fantastic Four #1 hit the stands. Note the tease of a Captain America return (that would take two years to come to fruition), and the mention of Amazing Adult Fantasy (which would include the premiere of Spider-Man). Exciting times, huh?(Oh, and if you’re wondering what 655 Madison Avenue looked like at the time? It looked like this.)

    Letter from Stan Lee to Jerry Bails, 1961. This letter was written only a few weeks after Fantastic Four #1 hit the stands. Note the tease of a Captain America return (that would take two years to come to fruition), and the mention of Amazing Adult Fantasy (which would include the premiere of Spider-Man).

    Exciting times, huh?

    (Oh, and if you’re wondering what 655 Madison Avenue looked like at the time? It looked like this.)

    — 6 months ago with 57 notes
    #Stan Lee  #letters  #jerry bails  #captain america  #fantastic four  #spider-man  #amazing adult fantasy 
    1964 letter to a fan, from Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

    1964 letter to a fan, from Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

    — 7 months ago with 53 notes
    #Stan Lee  #Jack Kirby  #letters 

    1966 letter from Jim Steranko to Joe Simon about Steranko’s creations for the Simon-edited Harvey Thriller line of superheroes, including Spyman and Sorcerer.

    In the letter, Steranko insists to Simon—who’d co-created Captain America co-creator a quarter century earlier but was now aiming to compete with Marvel Comics—that they should utilize a tongue-in-cheek tone. “It is, incidentally, one of the reasons Marvel has done so well with their line of comics.”

    Within a few months, Steranko would quit Harvey and begin working for Marvel. (You can read more about this, of course, in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.)


    — 7 months ago with 42 notes
    #Jim Steranko  #Joe Simon  #Harvey Comics  #Spyman  #Sorcerer  #letters  #Syd Shores  #Bob Wood  #Fighting American  #Marvel 
    Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.




After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years. 





“Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.” Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

    Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.

    After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years.

    “Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.”

    Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

    — 8 months ago with 215 notes
    #Steve Ditko  #Stan Lee  #Spider-Man  #letters 
    Twenty years ago: James Cameron submits his treatment for the Spider-Man film to Marvel. “I look forward to working with you to realize this very special motion picture.”
Ten pages of the treatment are here.

    Twenty years ago: James Cameron submits his treatment for the Spider-Man film to Marvel. “I look forward to working with you to realize this very special motion picture.”

    Ten pages of the treatment are here.

    — 1 year ago with 124 notes
    #James Cameron  #Spider-Man  #Letters  #Terry Stewart