Showing posts tagged Gil Kane.
x

THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


Go to SEANHOWE.COM to purchase a copy of the book, now in paperback, or to read a chapter for free ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    "Brooklyn’s Comic Artists" at the Brooklyn Museum, 1974:
A Community Gallery Exhibition of the work of 13 Brooklyn professionals, Brooklyn’s Comic Book Artists includes original drawings and layouts by the creators of such popular comic books as “Batman” (Carmine Infantino), “Green Lantern” and “Spiderman” (Gil Kane), “Captain America” and “Fantastic Four” (Jack Kirby), “Little Anny Fanny” (Harvey Kurtzman), “Richie Rich” (Dom Sileo), and “Flash Gordon” (Al Williamson). Other comic books represented are “Deadman” (Neal Adams), “The Spirit” (Will Eisner), “Tommy Tomorrow” (Lee Elias) , “Archie” (Victor Gorelick) “Tarzan” (Joe Kubert), “El Diablo” (Gray Morrow) and “Creepy Comics” (Angelo Torres). A photographic essay explains the process of comic book production from conception to newsstand delivery. Organized by Phil Seuling, a Brooklyn high school teacher and founder of the annual New York City Comic Art Convention, the exhibition was installed by Richard Waller, Coordinator of the Community Gallery, with the aid of a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.

    "Brooklyn’s Comic Artists" at the Brooklyn Museum, 1974:

    A Community Gallery Exhibition of the work of 13 Brooklyn professionals, Brooklyn’s Comic Book Artists includes original drawings and layouts by the creators of such popular comic books as “Batman” (Carmine Infantino), “Green Lantern” and “Spiderman” (Gil Kane), “Captain America” and “Fantastic Four” (Jack Kirby), “Little Anny Fanny” (Harvey Kurtzman), “Richie Rich” (Dom Sileo), and “Flash Gordon” (Al Williamson). Other comic books represented are “Deadman” (Neal Adams), “The Spirit” (Will Eisner), “Tommy Tomorrow” (Lee Elias) , “Archie” (Victor Gorelick) “Tarzan” (Joe Kubert), “El Diablo” (Gray Morrow) and “Creepy Comics” (Angelo Torres). A photographic essay explains the process of comic book production from conception to newsstand delivery. Organized by Phil Seuling, a Brooklyn high school teacher and founder of the annual New York City Comic Art Convention, the exhibition was installed by Richard Waller, Coordinator of the Community Gallery, with the aid of a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts.

    — 2 months ago with 12 notes
    #brooklyn museum  #carmine infantino  #gil kane  #steve ditko  #jack kirby  #harvey kurtzman  #dom sileo  #al williamson  #will eisner  #lee elias  #victor gorelick  #joe kubert  #gray morrow  #angelo torres  #phil seuling 
    The Mighty Marvel Bullpen, circa 1970.Of course, the idea of the Bullpen was mostly exaggerated at this time, and so some of these folks must have come in specifically for the photo. But still: [Unknown], Gil Kane, Stu Schwartzberg, Gerry Conway, Bill Everett, Herb Trimpe, Marie Severin, John Verpoorten, [Unknown], Roy Thomas, Larry Lieber, John Romita, Morrie Kuramoto, [Unknown (Allyn Brodsky?)]This will be updated if more people are identified…
 

    The Mighty Marvel Bullpen, circa 1970.

    Of course, the idea of the Bullpen was mostly exaggerated at this time, and so some of these folks must have come in specifically for the photo. But still:

    [Unknown], Gil Kane, Stu Schwartzberg, Gerry Conway, Bill Everett, Herb Trimpe, Marie Severin, John Verpoorten, [Unknown], Roy Thomas, Larry Lieber, John Romita, Morrie Kuramoto, [Unknown (Allyn Brodsky?)]

    This will be updated if more people are identified…


     

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 5 months ago with 87 notes
    #gil kane  #stu schwartzberg  #gerry conway  #bill everett  #herb trimpe  #marie severin  #John Verpoorten  #roy thomas  #john romita  #morrie kuramoto  #larry lieber 

    This is not an April Fools joke.

    Above, you’ll see John Romita’s original art for the cover to Amazing Spider-Man #121. That issue contains one of the most important stories in the history of Marvel Comics; if you’re not familiar with it, you can read plenty about it at its Wikipedia page. It was written by Gerry Conway.

    It’s also the basis for the next Spider-Man movie, which comes out next month.

    Now, you’d think that Sony Pictures could find a seat for Gerry Conway. But according to the author of “The Night Gwen Stacy Died,” Sony has yet to acknowledge him.

    Last year I went to a press screening of Fox Entertainment’s THE WOLVERINE with Chris Claremont, the writer of the movie’s source material. Claremont was my plus one—he hadn’t been invited to a premiere or a screening. We watched the closing credits together, searching in vain for his name. (Marvel Entertainment and its parent corporation, The Walt Disney Company, have their own checkered history with treatment of talent, but neither THE WOLVERINE nor AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 were produced by them.)

    Do you think this is acceptable behavior toward creators? Should Gerry Conway have to take to social media to get an invitation the premiere of a movie based on his work? It’s not like he’s asking for any of the QUARTER OF A BILLION DOLLARS the movie is expected to bring in at the box office.

    Here is Gerry Conway’s Twitter account; have a look. And please consider helping him get the word out.

    #inviteGerryConway


    UPDATE:

    Props to Justin Sullivan at the LA Times for covering this.
    http://herocomplex.latimes.com/movies/amazing-spider-man-2-gerry-conway-campaigns-for-premiere-invite/

    — 5 months ago with 287 notes
    #spider-man  #spider man  #gerry conway  #gwen stacy  #invitegerryconway  #john romita  #gil kane 
    comicspectrumoa:

Jungle Action #9 p 16 by Gil Kane + Klaus Janson - from the collection of Bob Bretall

    comicspectrumoa:

    Jungle Action #9 p 16 by Gil Kane + Klaus Janson - from the collection of Bob Bretall

    — 6 months ago with 63 notes
    #jungle action  #black panther  #gil kane  #klaus janson  #don mcgregor 
    Back cover from Savage Fists of Kung Fu #1 by Gil Kane and Dan Adkins, 1975.

    Back cover from Savage Fists of Kung Fu #1 by Gil Kane and Dan Adkins, 1975.

    — 7 months ago with 22 notes
    #Gil Kane  #Dan Adkins  #Fu Manchu  #deadly hands of kung fu  #shang-chi  #iron fist 

    Untold Stories: Marvel Sells Stash of Original Art (by John Romita, Gil Kane, and others) for $770, 1973

    “But think about the Marvel Warehouse of Original Art! Since there is some disagreement as to whom finished art truly belongs (the penciler merely pencils, the inker merely inks, the letterer letters), Marvel prudently settles the question by appropriating all.”
    Creem, April 1973

    Marvel began returning current pages to artists sometime in 1974, and eventually worked retroactively back a few months, to comics cover-dated from January 1974; among the earliest issues from which art was sent back were Avengers #119 and Amazing Spider-Man #128. 

    But a year earlier, Marvel sold the covers to these issues, cover-dated January 1973, to the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Seven covers, plus progressive proofs and color guides for each, for a total of $770.

    Back in 1986, Irene Vartanoff (who began managing artwork return in 1975) told The Comics Journal that Marvel would occasionally send artwork to exhibits. But as far as I know, this is the only evidence that exists of Marvel actually accepting money for pages of original art.

    It’s unclear if the gallery still possesses the pages; nothing comes up on their inventory database. But if Rich Buckler, Joe Sinnott, Barry Smith, John Romita, Sal Buscema, or Tom Palmer happens to read this, they may want to give them a call.

    UPDATE: It looks like the pages were displayed in 2006, as part of an exhibit called Funny Papers, and that—great news—the gallery then returned the works to the artists.

    — 1 year ago with 42 notes
    #original art  #Gil Kane  #rich buckler  #sal buscema  #joe sinnott  #John Romita  #Tom Palmer  #Barry Smith 
    Giant Superhero Holiday Grab-Bag! From Marvel Treasury Edition #13, 1976. Art by Gil Kane and Joe Sinnott

    Giant Superhero Holiday Grab-Bag! From Marvel Treasury Edition #13, 1976. Art by Gil Kane and Joe Sinnott

    — 1 year ago with 113 notes
    #xmas  #gil kane  #joe sinnott 

    JIM SHOOTER IN THE 1960s

    For four years, the teenaged Shooter worked for Mort Weisinger on various iterations of the Superman mythos—Superboy, Supergirl, etc.—not only writing scripts, but providing cover designs as well. He also won the good graces of artists Gil Kane and Wally Wood by providing stick-figure layouts for each page. But as high school wore on, the allure of the money began to wear off—it never seemed to be enough for his family anyway. What mattered now was the accolades.

    Unfortunately, praise was limited to the occasional article in the Pittsburgh newspaper or segment on the local TV news. “My father probably said four or five words to me the whole time I was growing up,” said Shooter. “One of the greatest men to ever walk the earth … but not at connecting with people. He made no comment whatsoever.” And Weisinger didn’t just withhold praise—he cruelly berated his teenage employee, calling from New York every Thursday night, following the weekly Batman television broadcast, with a litany of complaints: It’s not on time. It’s over the page limit. How the hell can we get a cover out of this? Why can’t you write like you used to? He referred to Shooter as his “charity case.” “He caused a kind of pathological fear of telephones in me,” Shooter once told an interviewer. “I felt more and more inadequate … and my last chance to be a kid was slipping by.”

    Text from
    http://seanhowe.com/Marvel.html

    — 1 year ago with 42 notes
    #Jim Shooter  #Mort Weisinger  #Gil Kane  #Wally Wood 

    “I would tell any cartoonist who has an idea, think twice before you give it to a publisher.” —Stan Lee, 1971


    Here’s one of the many fascinating documents I came across in the process of researching Marvel Comics: The Untold Story: Stan Lee forcefully criticizing the comic industry’s treatment of creators.

    On the evening of Wednesday, January 20, 1971, Stan Lee joined a number of comic veterans—including Gil Kane, Will Eisner, and Archie Comics publisher John Goldwater—at the Lambs Club in Manhattan for a discussion about the state of the industry. Jack Kirby had quit Marvel the previous spring, and Lee himself was only a few months away from taking a sabbatical to collaborate on a film script with Alain Resnais. His disillusion with the world of comics is striking, as is the spirited nature of the debate with the other panelists, some of whom seem to feel he’s putting too much blame on publishers.

    “I would say that the comic book market is the worst market that there is on the face of the earth for creative talent and the reasons are numberless and legion,’ says Lee. “I have had many talented people ask me how to get into the comic book business. If they were talented enough the first answer I would give them is, ‘Why would you want to get into the comic book business?’ Because even if you succeed, even if you reach what might be considered the pinnacle of success in comics, you will be less successful, less secure and less effective than if you are just an average practitioner of your art in television, radio, movies or what have you. It is a business in which the creator, as was mentioned before, owns nothing of his creation. The publisher owns it….”

    The above documents pick up the conversation about halfway through. Near the end, you can practically hear Stan Lee prophesizing his escape hatch to Hollywood: “Isn’t it pathetic to be in a business where the most you can say for the creative person in the business is that he’s serving an apprenticeship to enter a better field? Why not go to the other field directly?”

    — 1 year ago with 149 notes
    #Gil Kane  #Stan Lee  #Will Eisner  #Jack Kirby  #Marvel  #Comics 
    Nearly everything about 1975’s GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1 is a familiar echo of 1961’s FANTASTIC FOUR #1: the Magnificent Seven–like gathering of the team, the dysfunctional bickering, the mysterious island to which they are summoned, even the dramatic escape by plane as the island explodes behind them. With the final word balloon of the issue—“what are we going to do with thirteen X-Men?” someone in the plane asks—the transition begins. The old X-Men will be put out to pasture; the new X-Men will have a shot at capturing a younger audience.

    Nearly everything about 1975’s GIANT-SIZE X-MEN #1 is a familiar echo of 1961’s FANTASTIC FOUR #1: the Magnificent Seven–like gathering of the team, the dysfunctional bickering, the mysterious island to which they are summoned, even the dramatic escape by plane as the island explodes behind them.
    With the final word balloon of the issue—“what are we going to do with thirteen X-Men?” someone in the plane asks—the transition begins. The old X-Men will be put out to pasture; the new X-Men will have a shot at capturing a younger audience.

    — 2 years ago with 145 notes
    #x-men  #gil kane  #wolverine  #storm  #thunderbird  #nightcrawler  #cyclops  #colossus  #jean grey  #beast  #angel  #iceman 
    The Marvel Bullpen, circa 1970.
 Unknown, Stu Schwartzberg, Gil Kane, Gerry Conway, Bill Everett, Herb Trimpe, Marie Severin, John Verpoorten, Roy Thomas, John Romita, Morrie Kuramoto, Unknown (Allyn Brodsky?).
Can anyone identify the men at either end of the picture?

    The Marvel Bullpen, circa 1970.

    Unknown, Stu Schwartzberg, Gil Kane, Gerry Conway, Bill Everett, Herb Trimpe, Marie Severin, John Verpoorten, Roy Thomas, John Romita, Morrie Kuramoto, Unknown (Allyn Brodsky?).


    Can anyone identify the men at either end of the picture?


    — 2 years ago with 87 notes
    #stu schwartzberg  #gil kane  #gerry conway  #bill everett  #herb trimpe  #marie severin  #john verpoorten  #roy thomas  #john romita  #larry lieber  #morrie kuramoto  #some kid 
    Amazing Spider-Man #101 (October, 1971). Art by Gil Kane and Frank Giacoia, Words by Roy Thomas.

    Amazing Spider-Man #101 (October, 1971). Art by Gil Kane and Frank Giacoia, Words by Roy Thomas.

    — 2 years ago with 12 notes
    #betty friedan  #3rd wave gwen  #swedish film  #(i am curious) yellow  #criterion collection  #vilgot sjolman  #Vilgot Sjöman  #peter parker  #gil kane  #roy thomas  #insane panels