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THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    Panel and detail from page 2 of Wolverine #1 (1982).

    Art by Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein. Words by Chris Claremont. Lettering by Tom Orzechowski.

    — 1 week ago with 75 notes
    #wolverine  #frank miller  #Joe Rubinstein  #chris claremont  #Tom Orzechowski 

    Chris Claremont Documentary(Photo: Paul Smith and Chris Claremont, circa 1983.)

    X-Men: Days of Future Past, which would not exist without Claremont, opens on Friday. In the meantime, here’s a 41-minute documentary on Claremont’s X-Men, with exclusive interviews with Claremont, Jim Shooter, Louise Simonson, Len Wein, Annie Nocenti, Peter Sanderson, and, uh, me.

    — 3 months ago with 306 notes
    #x-men  #Chris Claremont  #days of future past  #paul smith 
    The classic Terry Austin cover to X-Men #142 reimagined with the Avengers and Ultron.Art by Lee Garbett.

    The classic Terry Austin cover to X-Men #142 reimagined with the Avengers and Ultron.
    Art by Lee Garbett.

    — 4 months ago with 58 notes
    #terry austin  #x-men  #chris claremont  #lee garbett  #avengers  #ultron  #wolverine  #sentinels  #iron man  #days of future past  #black widow  #storm 

    Captain America’s Roseland Ballroom, 1956-2014.

    Roseland closes tonight.

    From Captain America #258, June 1981
    Caption: On 52nd Street in Manhattan, between Broadway and 8th Avenue, stands one of New York’s celebrated landmarks—a dance hall called Roseland. In this age of new wave, rock ‘n’ roll and disco, it’s a place where a couple can do a slow, romantic shuffle to the music of a big band. And among tonight’s couples are Steve Rogers (perhaps more widely known as Captain America) and his downstairs neighbor Bernadette Rosenthal.

    "Strange. I was last here almost forty years ago. It was a victory bonds party. So long ago, yet for me it seems like only yesterday. I’m still young, thanks to the years I spent in suspended animation after the war—but the WAC I danced with should be in her 60s. With children and grandchildren. I’ve seen so much in my life—and yet I’ve lost so much more that can never be regained."

    Poor Captain America, fated to outlive everything he’s ever loved.

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 4 months ago with 289 notes
    #captain america  #roseland  #roseland ballroom  #chris claremont  #mike zeck 

    Chris Claremont and Frank Miller (Photograph by Jackie Estrada)

    When the 1981 San Diego Comic-Con kicked off in the last week of July, Frank Miller had just put the finishing touches on an issue of Daredevil that devoted four pages to nearly wordless fighting between Elektra and Bullseye on Sixth Avenue. Their confrontation ended when he impaled her with her own weapon; she crawled to Matt Murdock and died in his arms.

    With no idea what was in store, the blissfully unaware audience at the Comic-Con instead celebrated Elektra’s triumph in the latest, all-ninja-battle issue of Daredevil, obsessed over the marital strife of Yellowjacket and the Wasp in The Avengers, and pored over Magneto’s return in the new double-sized issue of The X-Men. The shocking revelation that the X-Men’s silver-haired archenemy had been a child prisoner at Auschwitz ramped up the title’s long-present themes of bigotry and persecution and pointed to the direction that The X-Men would take for the decades to come, in which discrimination toward mutant characters was put explicitly in the contexts of racism and homophobia. In the Marvel Universe, “Mutie” became a regularly uttered epithet, bigotry bloomed, and the X-Men became increasingly paranoid about their place in the world.

    By and large, the X-Men stories in the year since the “Dark Phoenix Saga” had paled in comparison to what had come before. The old hands who weren’t writing The X-Men were all too happy to point out that its sales had surpassed its aesthetic achievement, and that it benefited from a lack of other exciting options. If The X-Men had been published in the mid–1970s, Steve Englehart insisted in interviews, it wouldn’t have been such a phenomenon. “In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king,” sniffed Roy Thomas. It was a dedicated kingdom, though: according to Diana Schutz, a manager at Comics & Comix in Berkeley, California, “People were buying case lots of X-Men. Two, three hundred copies. Some people were buying two lots, for investment purposes.” Appearances by Man-Thing, Spider-Woman, Dazzler, and Doctor Doom reestablished the X-Men’s ties with the rest of the Marvel Universe, but there was also the nagging feeling that those crossovers were just meant to jump-start sales of less popular characters. Or maybe something was just being held back. Dave Cockrum created an amphibious heroine named Silkie, and then retracted the character when he couldn’t negotiate to retain partial ownership. He had a whole group of new heroes, he said—but they’d remain his now.

    At the weekend’s end, on the way back to Los Angeles from San Diego, Miller and Claremont were stuck in traffic for two hours. A conversation about Wolverine—a character about whom Miller had previously expressed disinterest—shifted into talk about their mutual appreciation of samurai movies and manga. By the time they’d reached their destination, they’d begun plotting a story for a four-issue Wolverine series.

    “It’s me and Frank Miller and [inker] Josef Rubinstein,” Claremont told an interviewer, “and we’re going to make lots of money.”

    The above text is excerpted from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

    [Note: Jackie Estrada is raising funds to publish a book featuring hundreds of the photographs of comics giants she’s taken over the years. Check it out!]


    — 7 months ago with 359 notes
    #frank miller  #chris claremont  #wolverine  #elektra  #jackie estrada  #excerpts 
    johnbyrnedraws:

X-Men #119, page 22 by John Byrne & Terry Austin. 1979.

    johnbyrnedraws:

    X-Men #119, page 22 by John Byrne & Terry Austin. 1979.

    (via themarvelageofcomics)

    — 9 months ago with 83 notes
    #x-men  #chris claremont  #john byrne  #original art 
    themarvelproject:

Uncanny X-Men #168 Page 18 art by Paul Smith and Bob Wiacek (April 1983)

    themarvelproject:

    Uncanny X-Men #168 Page 18 art by Paul Smith and Bob Wiacek (April 1983)

    (Source: comicartfans.com, via themarvelageofcomics)

    — 10 months ago with 450 notes
    #x-men  #paul smith  #bob wiacek  #chris claremont  #Tom Orzechowski  #nightcrawler  #bamf 
    1987: Jim Lee at MarvelCarl Potts’ DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics was published this week, and so I thought I’d take a moment to highlight a passage from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about Potts’ impact as an editor._______Art Adams had an immediate impact on his aspiring peers, the young men who’d been weaned on Claremont and Byrne’s X-Men and Frank Miller’s Daredevil and who’d seen the visual style of Marvel Comics settle into staid functionality. In the last days of the Jim Shooter reign, there emerged a clutch of young artists who determinedly rendered every strand of hair, every stretch of clothing, every tooth in their characters’ mouths. If there was a scene with a brick wall destroyed, you could bet that every single brick would be delineated.
The inker on Adams’s Longshot was a Filipino art school dropout named Whilce Portacio. Portacio was great at rendering details but needed improvement when it came to anatomy and perspective, so editor Carl Potts had him work over Adams’s pencils, hoping he could learn a thing or two along the way. In the meantime, Potts fed Portacio books like The Five C’s of Cinematography and kept him busy with work inking Alpha Flight. Shortly afterward, when Potts hired Jim Lee, an excessively polite, South Korean Ivy Leaguer, to draw Alpha Flight, the two artists meshed artistically and personally. Now Lee, too, got a copy of the cinematography book, and Potts drilled him on storytelling fundamentals, much like Denny O’Neil had with Frank Miller a decade earlier. Then Lee moved to San Diego and into a studio with Portacio. Their lives and careers were now entwined for good.
_______
You can view sample pages of The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics here.

    1987: Jim Lee at Marvel

    Carl Potts’ DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics was published this week, and so I thought I’d take a moment to highlight a passage from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about Potts’ impact as an editor.
    _______

    Art Adams had an immediate impact on his aspiring peers, the young men who’d been weaned on Claremont and Byrne’s X-Men and Frank Miller’s Daredevil and who’d seen the visual style of Marvel Comics settle into staid functionality. In the last days of the Jim Shooter reign, there emerged a clutch of young artists who determinedly rendered every strand of hair, every stretch of clothing, every tooth in their characters’ mouths. If there was a scene with a brick wall destroyed, you could bet that every single brick would be delineated.

    The inker on Adams’s Longshot was a Filipino art school dropout named Whilce Portacio. Portacio was great at rendering details but needed improvement when it came to anatomy and perspective, so editor Carl Potts had him work over Adams’s pencils, hoping he could learn a thing or two along the way. In the meantime, Potts fed Portacio books like The Five C’s of Cinematography and kept him busy with work inking Alpha Flight. Shortly afterward, when Potts hired Jim Lee, an excessively polite, South Korean Ivy Leaguer, to draw Alpha Flight, the two artists meshed artistically and personally. Now Lee, too, got a copy of the cinematography book, and Potts drilled him on storytelling fundamentals, much like Denny O’Neil had with Frank Miller a decade earlier. Then Lee moved to San Diego and into a studio with Portacio. Their lives and careers were now entwined for good.

    _______

    You can view sample pages of The DC Comics Guide to Creating Comics here.

    — 10 months ago with 122 notes
    #carl potts  #art adams  #chris claremont  #john byrne  #jim shoter  #daredevil  #longshot  #x-men  #whilce portacio  #jim lee  #alpha flight  #frank miller  #Denny O'Neil  #photo  #excerpts  #image 
    X-Men writers Chris Claremont and Scott Lobdell, circa 1998.

    X-Men writers Chris Claremont and Scott Lobdell, circa 1998.

    — 10 months ago with 105 notes
    #Chris Claremont  #scott lobdell  #photos  #x-men 
    Illyana Rasputin and Kitty Pryde in X-MEN SPECIAL EDITION #1, 1983. Art by Dave Cockrum and Hilary Barta. Words by Chris Claremont.

    Illyana Rasputin and Kitty Pryde in X-MEN SPECIAL EDITION #1, 1983. Art by Dave Cockrum and Hilary Barta. Words by Chris Claremont.

    — 12 months ago with 155 notes
    #Illyana Rasputin  #Kitty Pryde  #Dave Cockrum  #X-Men  #Hilary Barta  #Chris Claremont 
    Chris Claremont and I went to Times Square and watched THE WOLVERINE, which was based on the miniseries he did with Frank Miller, and then we talked about it afterward. You can read that conversation here. Unfortunately, he didn’t get a credit from Fox, not even a “special thanks” at the end. Nor, as far as I could tell, did any comics writer or artist, including Len Wein and John Romita, who created the character.(Image: From Wolverine #3, November 1982. Art by Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein. Words by Chris Claremont. Lettering by Tom Orzechowski.)

    Chris Claremont and I went to Times Square and watched THE WOLVERINE, which was based on the miniseries he did with Frank Miller, and then we talked about it afterward. You can read that conversation here.

    Unfortunately, he didn’t get a credit from Fox, not even a “special thanks” at the end. Nor, as far as I could tell, did any comics writer or artist, including Len Wein and John Romita, who created the character.


    (Image: From Wolverine #3, November 1982. Art by Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein. Words by Chris Claremont. Lettering by Tom Orzechowski.)

    — 1 year ago with 159 notes
    #Frank Miller  #Joe Rubinstein  #Chris Claremont  #Tom Orzechowski  #Wolverine  #Len Wein  #John Romita 

    In 1974, several members of the Marvel Bullpen—including Chris Claremont, Steve Gerber, Don McGregor, Len and Glynis Wein, and Marv and Michele Wolfman—gathered at the home of Gerry Conway to discuss THE EXORCIST. Here’s what they said.

    — 1 year ago with 26 notes
    #Chris Claremont  #Steve Gerber  #Don McGregor  #Len Wein  #Glynis Wein  #Marv Wolfman  #Michele Wolfman  #Gerry Conway  #The Exorcist  #william friedkin 
    themarvelageofcomics:

A page from MARVEL AND DC PRESENT THE UNCANNY X-MEN AND THE NEW TEEN TITANS by Walt Simonson and Terry Austin.

    themarvelageofcomics:

    A page from MARVEL AND DC PRESENT THE UNCANNY X-MEN AND THE NEW TEEN TITANS by Walt Simonson and Terry Austin.

    — 1 year ago with 82 notes
    #X-Men  #New Teen Titans  #Walter Simonson  #Terry Austin  #Chris Claremont