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THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    Original art by Frank Miller, for the cover of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns #2, 1986. This was also the image on the shirt Miller was wearing when we first met to speak for the story in the September issue of Wired.

    Original art by Frank Miller, for the cover of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns #2, 1986.

    This was also the image on the shirt Miller was wearing when we first met to speak for the story in the September issue of Wired.

    — 1 week ago with 421 notes
    #frank miller  #batman: the dark knight returns  #batman  #dark knight  #original art 
    Batman #315, September 1979.

    Batman #315, September 1979.

    — 1 month ago with 29 notes
    #batman 
    Press release for Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, 1986:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 27, 1986 DARK KNIGHT* RECEIVES INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE Frank Miller continues to break new ground in the comics industry. He revolutionized the comic book when he wrote and illustrated the six issue mini-series RONIN*, published in 193-1984. Now, Frank’s treatment of Batman* in the four issue DARK KNIGHT series will prove equally ground-breaking. “We’re always talking about how important it is to expand the market for comics,” explains DC Comics Vice President-Executive Editor Dick Giordano. “We know comics aren’t just for kids anymore, but it’s difficult to convince people of that.” Miller’s treatment of the Caped Crusader will prove revolutionary for both DC Comics and the comic industry overall. In feature stories schedules to run in upcoming issues of Rolling Stone and Spin, both available nationally and internationally through newsstands and subscription, Frank will discuss DARK KNIGHT and the comics industry. DC Comics plans to advertise the series in both rock music publications. Other national media coverage of the series is pending.  Notes Richard Gehr, editor at Spin, “I think comics and science fiction are once again on the cutting edge of popular culture. They deserve their rightful place in magazines like Spin.” The DARK KNIGHT series of four 48-page issues depicts Batman’s last stand. The story takes place 10 years after Batman has retired, when he’s pushing 50. Circumstances in Gotham City* combine with his personal life to put Bruce Wayne back into action for one final time. The series introduces a new, female Robin*; several classic Batman villains; and Batman paraphrenalia [sic] updated and computerized. Superman* will appear in two of the four issues.  The series will be printed in a deluxe format comparable to the RONIN series. Art Director Richard Bruning describes it as “the best of the traditional format with the advantages of new technologies. DARK KNIGHT is more like a series of comic book-sized graphic novels than a comic book series.” In addition to the national media coverage, DARK KNIGHT will be supported by a four-color retail poster that sells for $4.95 in comic book specialty stores; and a unique three-dimensional 9” x 13” counter display card. A recent innovation for the printing world, the three-dimensional point-of-purchase poster has never been used in the comics industry before.  The DARK KNIGHT series reunited for the first time the penciller/writer, inker, and editor of Marvel Comics Group’s DAREDEVIL: Miller, Klaus Janson, and Denny O’Neil, respectively. The series is colored by Lynn Varley. Each contributor has done his/her best artistic work to date.  DARK KNIGHT #1 ships on February 25, 1986, to comic book specialty stores nationwide. Each issue sells for $2.95. *indicates trademark of DC Comics Inc.

via Mike Sterling

    Press release for Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, 1986:

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    January 27, 1986

    DARK KNIGHT* RECEIVES INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

    Frank Miller continues to break new ground in the comics industry. He revolutionized the comic book when he wrote and illustrated the six issue mini-series RONIN*, published in 193-1984. Now, Frank’s treatment of Batman* in the four issue DARK KNIGHT series will prove equally ground-breaking.

    “We’re always talking about how important it is to expand the market for comics,” explains DC Comics Vice President-Executive Editor Dick Giordano. “We know comics aren’t just for kids anymore, but it’s difficult to convince people of that.”

    Miller’s treatment of the Caped Crusader will prove revolutionary for both DC Comics and the comic industry overall. In feature stories schedules to run in upcoming issues of Rolling Stone and Spin, both available nationally and internationally through newsstands and subscription, Frank will discuss DARK KNIGHT and the comics industry. DC Comics plans to advertise the series in both rock music publications. Other national media coverage of the series is pending.

    Notes Richard Gehr, editor at Spin, “I think comics and science fiction are once again on the cutting edge of popular culture. They deserve their rightful place in magazines like Spin.”

    The DARK KNIGHT series of four 48-page issues depicts Batman’s last stand. The story takes place 10 years after Batman has retired, when he’s pushing 50. Circumstances in Gotham City* combine with his personal life to put Bruce Wayne back into action for one final time. The series introduces a new, female Robin*; several classic Batman villains; and Batman paraphrenalia
    [sic] updated and computerized. Superman* will appear in two of the four issues.

    The series will be printed in a deluxe format comparable to the RONIN series. Art Director Richard Bruning describes it as “the best of the traditional format with the advantages of new technologies. DARK KNIGHT is more like a series of comic book-sized graphic novels than a comic book series.”

    In addition to the national media coverage, DARK KNIGHT will be supported by a four-color retail poster that sells for $4.95 in comic book specialty stores; and a unique three-dimensional 9” x 13” counter display card. A recent innovation for the printing world, the three-dimensional point-of-purchase poster has never been used in the comics industry before.

    The DARK KNIGHT series reunited for the first time the penciller/writer, inker, and editor of Marvel Comics Group’s DAREDEVIL: Miller, Klaus Janson, and Denny O’Neil, respectively. The series is colored by Lynn Varley. Each contributor has done his/her best artistic work to date.

    DARK KNIGHT #1 ships on February 25, 1986, to comic book specialty stores nationwide. Each issue sells for $2.95.

    *indicates trademark of DC Comics Inc.

    via Mike Sterling

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 1 month ago with 58 notes
    #frank miller  #klaus janson  #lynn varley  #batman  #batman: the dark knight returns 
    Frank Miller and Lynn Varley channel Hugh Ferriss in 1986, three years before the Tim Burton movie.

    Frank Miller and Lynn Varley channel Hugh Ferriss in 1986, three years before the Tim Burton movie.

    — 2 months ago with 730 notes
    #frank miller  #lynn varley  #batman  #dark knight  #batman: the dark knight returns  #hugh ferriss  #anton furst  #tim burton 
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 27, 1986 DARK KNIGHT* RECEIVES INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE Frank Miller continues to break new ground in the comics industry. He revolutionized the comic book when he wrote and illustrated the six issue mini-series RONIN*, published in 193-1984. Now, Frank’s treatment of Batman* in the four issue DARK KNIGHT series will prove equally ground-breaking. “We’re always talking about how important it is to expand the market for comics,” explains DC Comics Vice President-Executive Editor Dick Giordano. “We know comics aren’t just for kids anymore, but it’s difficult to convince people of that.” Miller’s treatment of the Caped Crusader will prove revolutionary for both DC Comics and the comic industry overall. In feature stories schedules to run in upcoming issues of Rolling Stone and Spin, both available nationally and internationally through newsstands and subscription, Frank will discuss DARK KNIGHT and the comics industry. DC Comics plans to advertise the series in both rock music publications. Other national media coverage of the series is pending.  Notes Richard Gehr, editor at Spin, “I think comics and science fiction are once again on the cutting edge of popular culture. They deserve their rightful place in magazines like Spin.” The DARK KNIGHT series of four 48-page issues depicts Batman’s last stand. The story takes place 10 years after Batman has retired, when he’s pushing 50. Circumstances in Gotham City* combine with his personal life to put Bruce Wayne back into action for one final time. The series introduces a new, female Robin*; several classic Batman villains; and Batman paraphrenalia [sic] updated and computerized. Superman* will appear in two of the four issues.  The series will be printed in a deluxe format comparable to the RONIN series. Art Director Richard Bruning describes it as “the best of the traditional format with the advantages of new technologies. DARK KNIGHT is more like a series of comic book-sized graphic novels than a comic book series.” In addition to the national media coverage, DARK KNIGHT will be supported by a four-color retail poster that sells for $4.95 in comic book specialty stores; and a unique three-dimensional 9” x 13” counter display card. A recent innovation for the printing world, the three-dimensional point-of-purchase poster has never been used in the comics industry before.  The DARK KNIGHT series reunited for the first time the penciller/writer, inker, and editor of Marvel Comics Group’s DAREDEVIL: Miller, Klaus Janson, and Denny O’Neil, respectively. The series is colored by Lynn Varley. Each contributor has done his/her best artistic work to date.  DARK KNIGHT #1 ships on February 25, 1986, to comic book specialty stores nationwide. Each issue sells for $2.95. *indicates trademark of DC Comics Inc.

via Mike Sterling

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    January 27, 1986

    DARK KNIGHT* RECEIVES INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

    Frank Miller continues to break new ground in the comics industry. He revolutionized the comic book when he wrote and illustrated the six issue mini-series RONIN*, published in 193-1984. Now, Frank’s treatment of Batman* in the four issue DARK KNIGHT series will prove equally ground-breaking.

    “We’re always talking about how important it is to expand the market for comics,” explains DC Comics Vice President-Executive Editor Dick Giordano. “We know comics aren’t just for kids anymore, but it’s difficult to convince people of that.”

    Miller’s treatment of the Caped Crusader will prove revolutionary for both DC Comics and the comic industry overall. In feature stories schedules to run in upcoming issues of Rolling Stone and Spin, both available nationally and internationally through newsstands and subscription, Frank will discuss DARK KNIGHT and the comics industry. DC Comics plans to advertise the series in both rock music publications. Other national media coverage of the series is pending.

    Notes Richard Gehr, editor at Spin, “I think comics and science fiction are once again on the cutting edge of popular culture. They deserve their rightful place in magazines like Spin.”

    The DARK KNIGHT series of four 48-page issues depicts Batman’s last stand. The story takes place 10 years after Batman has retired, when he’s pushing 50. Circumstances in Gotham City* combine with his personal life to put Bruce Wayne back into action for one final time. The series introduces a new, female Robin*; several classic Batman villains; and Batman paraphrenalia
    [sic] updated and computerized. Superman* will appear in two of the four issues.

    The series will be printed in a deluxe format comparable to the RONIN series. Art Director Richard Bruning describes it as “the best of the traditional format with the advantages of new technologies. DARK KNIGHT is more like a series of comic book-sized graphic novels than a comic book series.”

    In addition to the national media coverage, DARK KNIGHT will be supported by a four-color retail poster that sells for $4.95 in comic book specialty stores; and a unique three-dimensional 9” x 13” counter display card. A recent innovation for the printing world, the three-dimensional point-of-purchase poster has never been used in the comics industry before.

    The DARK KNIGHT series reunited for the first time the penciller/writer, inker, and editor of Marvel Comics Group’s DAREDEVIL: Miller, Klaus Janson, and Denny O’Neil, respectively. The series is colored by Lynn Varley. Each contributor has done his/her best artistic work to date.

    DARK KNIGHT #1 ships on February 25, 1986, to comic book specialty stores nationwide. Each issue sells for $2.95.

    *indicates trademark of DC Comics Inc.

    via Mike Sterling

    — 3 months ago with 58 notes
    #dark knight  #batman  #frank miller 

    Stan Lee dressed as Captain America, 1975
    Track down a copy of a May 1975 episode of the Mike Douglas Show and you’ll see George Carlin dressed as Spider-Man and Stan Lee dressed as Captain America. (You’ll also see Carlin mention that he wasn’t really a Marvel reader; he was more of an EC guy.)

    Lee still talks about how Carlin kept cutting off his answers.

    You’ll notice I don’t have a link to the video. Well, that’s because I’ve never seen it. I sure would like to, though! I’m throwing down the gauntlet—who can find it?


    — 5 months ago with 61 notes
    #george carlin  #stan lee  #batman  #captain america  #spider-man 
    From the Batman newspaper strip, October 1946.

    From the Batman newspaper strip, October 1946.

    — 6 months ago with 37 notes
    #batman  #no marvel content 
    From the Batman newspaper strip, October 1946.

    From the Batman newspaper strip, October 1946.

    — 6 months ago with 219 notes
    #batman  #no marvel content 
    Captain America and Bucky by Greg Moutafis, based on Dick Sprang’s cover for Detective Comics #156.

    Captain America and Bucky by Greg Moutafis, based on Dick Sprang’s cover for Detective Comics #156.

    — 9 months ago with 50 notes
    #captain america  #bucky  #batman  #robin  #greg moutafis  #dick sprang 
    Batman vs. Captain America! Hawkman vs. Starfox! Zatanna vs. the Scarlet Witch!Here’s a page of the infamous, never-completed, 1983 version of JLA/Avengers. Art by George Perez.

    Batman vs. Captain America! Hawkman vs. Starfox! Zatanna vs. the Scarlet Witch!

    Here’s a page of the infamous, never-completed, 1983 version of JLA/Avengers. Art by George Perez.

    — 10 months ago with 566 notes
    #batman  #captain america  #jla  #justice league  #avengers  #george perez  #starfox  #hawkman  #zatanna  #scarlet witch 
    Variety, March 9, 1966:____Krantz Digging in Comics FieldWith an eye on the kidvid slots, producers are now combing the newsstand comic books in earnest. One who’s been quick to wrap up TV rights is Steve Krantz, the Manhattan film distrub and video consultant for McCall’s mag.Exec has the telefilm deed on a quartet of comics put out by National Periodicals (“Superman,” “Batman,” etc.), plus a number of characters purveyed by the Marvel Comics Group. Included in the Krantz portfolio are “Metamorpho" (the element man), the "Atom," "Sea Devils," "Mystery in Space," and "Spider Man" (a regular ceiling walker, this guy). It’s all for the color animation mill.A pilot on “Spider” has just been completed, and Krantz reports that the next one to come off the drawing boards is to be “Metamorpho.”

    Variety, March 9, 1966:

    ____

    Krantz Digging in Comics Field

    With an eye on the kidvid slots, producers are now combing the newsstand comic books in earnest. One who’s been quick to wrap up TV rights is Steve Krantz, the Manhattan film distrub and video consultant for McCall’s mag.

    Exec has the telefilm deed on a quartet of comics put out by National Periodicals (“Superman,” “Batman,” etc.), plus a number of characters purveyed by the Marvel Comics Group. Included in the Krantz portfolio are “Metamorpho" (the element man), the "Atom," "Sea Devils," "Mystery in Space," and "Spider Man" (a regular ceiling walker, this guy). It’s all for the color animation mill.

    A pilot on “Spider” has just been completed, and Krantz reports that the next one to come off the drawing boards is to be “Metamorpho.”

    — 11 months ago with 85 notes
    #marvel super heroes  #robert krantz  #grantray lawrence  #superman  #batman  #metamorpho  #atom  #sea devils  #mystery in space  #spider-man  #iron man  #thor  #avengers  #hulk  #captain america  #animation  #ads  #clippings