THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

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(Above: Jack Kirby and Frank MIller)In June 1994, Frank Miller paid tribute to the late Jack Kirby, delivering a keynote speech at an industry seminar in Baltimore. “An age passes with Jack Kirby,” Miller said. “I can’t call it the Marvel Age of comics, because I don’t believe in rewarding thievery. I call it the Jack Kirby age of comics.” 
Members of the Marvel staff, sitting at a table front and center, shifted in their seats as Miller declared that the only way to talk about the future of comics was to talk about its “sad, sorry, history of broken lives … of talents denied the legal ownership of what they created with their own hands and minds, ignored or treated as nuisances while their creations went on to make millions and millions of dollars.” After noting that “seventeen years of loyal service and spectacular sales didn’t buy Chris Claremont one whit of loyalty from Marvel Comics,” and scoffing at Jim Shooter’s claims that he’d “spent his whole life fighting for creators’ rights,” Miller turned the screws. 
"Marvel Comics is trying to sell you all on the notion that characters are the only important component of its comics. As if nobody had to create these characters, as if the audience is so brain-dead they can’t tell a good job from a bad one. You can almost forgive them this, since their characters aren’t leaving in droves like the talent is. For me it’s a bit of a relief to finally see the old ‘work-made-for-hire talent don’t matter’ mentality put to the test. We’ve all seen the results, and they don’t even seem to be rearranging the deck chairs.” 





Creators who complained about defections to Image and other companies, he continued, were “like galley slaves complaining that the boat is leaking.” The age of company-owned superhero universes—the Jack Kirby Age—was over. “It’s gone supernova and burned itself out, and begun a slow steady collapse into a black hole. We couldn’t feed off the genius of Jack Kirby forever. The King is dead, and he has no successor. We will not see his like again. No single artist can replace him. No art form can be expected to be gifted with more than one talent as brilliant as his. It’s a scary time because change is always scary. But all the pieces are in place for a new proud era, a new age of comics. Nothing’s standing in our way, nothing too big and awful, nothing except some old bad habits and our own fears, and we won’t let them stop us.” 
The crowd rose to its feet. 
Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    (Above: Jack Kirby and Frank MIller)

    In
    June 1994, Frank Miller paid tribute to the late Jack Kirby, delivering a keynote speech at an industry seminar in Baltimore. “An age passes with Jack Kirby,” Miller said. “I can’t call it the Marvel Age of comics, because I don’t believe in rewarding thievery. I call it the Jack Kirby age of comics.”

    Members of the Marvel staff, sitting at a table front and center, shifted in their seats as Miller declared that the only way to talk about the future of comics was to talk about its “sad, sorry, history of broken lives … of talents denied the legal ownership of what they created with their own hands and minds, ignored or treated as nuisances while their creations went on to make millions and millions of dollars.” After noting that “seventeen years of loyal service and spectacular sales didn’t buy Chris Claremont one whit of loyalty from Marvel Comics,” and scoffing at Jim Shooter’s claims that he’d “spent his whole life fighting for creators’ rights,” Miller turned the screws.

    "Marvel Comics is trying to sell you all on the notion that characters are the only important component of its comics. As if nobody had to create these characters, as if the audience is so brain-dead they can’t tell a good job from a bad one. You can almost forgive them this, since their characters aren’t leaving in droves like the talent is. For me it’s a bit of a relief to finally see the old ‘work-made-for-hire talent don’t matter’ mentality put to the test. We’ve all seen the results, and they don’t even seem to be rearranging the deck chairs.”

    Creators who complained about defections to Image and other companies, he continued, were “like galley slaves complaining that the boat is leaking.” The age of company-owned superhero universes—the Jack Kirby Age—was over. “It’s gone supernova and burned itself out, and begun a slow steady collapse into a black hole. We couldn’t feed off the genius of Jack Kirby forever. The King is dead, and he has no successor. We will not see his like again. No single artist can replace him. No art form can be expected to be gifted with more than one talent as brilliant as his. It’s a scary time because change is always scary. But all the pieces are in place for a new proud era, a new age of comics. Nothing’s standing in our way, nothing too big and awful, nothing except some old bad habits and our own fears, and we won’t let them stop us.”

    The crowd rose to its feet.

    Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

    — 1 year ago with 381 notes
    #jack kirby  #frank miller 
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      YEP/
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      Fucking A frank miller, wish...didn’t go crazy
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      …the game changer then…
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