THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    By and large, the X-MEN stories in the year following the “Dark Phoenix Saga” and “Days of Future Past” had paled in comparison to what had come before. The old hands who weren’t writing THE X-MEN were all too happy to opine that its sales had surpassed its aesthetic achievement, and that it benefited from a lack of other exciting options. If THE X-MEN had been published in the mid–1970s, Steve Englehart insisted in interviews, it wouldn’t have been such a phenomenon. “In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king,” sniffed Roy Thomas. It was a dedicated kingdom, though: according to Diana Schutz, a manager at Comics & Comix in Berkeley, California, “People were buying case lots of X-Men. Two, three hundred copies. Some people were buying two lots, for investment purposes.” Appearances by Man-Thing, Spider-Woman, Dazzler, and Doctor Doom reestablished THE X-MEN’s ties with the rest of the Marvel Universe, but there was the nagging feeling that those crossovers were just meant to jump-start sales of less popular characters. Or maybe something was just being held back. Dave Cockrum created an amphibious heroine named Silkie, and then retracted the character when he couldn’t negotiate to retain partial ownership. He had a whole group of new heroes, he said—but they’d remain his now.

    By and large, the X-MEN stories in the year following the “Dark Phoenix Saga” and “Days of Future Past” had paled in comparison to what had come before. The old hands who weren’t writing THE X-MEN were all too happy to opine that its sales had surpassed its aesthetic achievement, and that it benefited from a lack of other exciting options. If THE X-MEN had been published in the mid–1970s, Steve Englehart insisted in interviews, it wouldn’t have been such a phenomenon. “In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king,” sniffed Roy Thomas. It was a dedicated kingdom, though: according to Diana Schutz, a manager at Comics & Comix in Berkeley, California, “People were buying case lots of X-Men. Two, three hundred copies. Some people were buying two lots, for investment purposes.” Appearances by Man-Thing, Spider-Woman, Dazzler, and Doctor Doom reestablished THE X-MEN’s ties with the rest of the Marvel Universe, but there was the nagging feeling that those crossovers were just meant to jump-start sales of less popular characters. Or maybe something was just being held back. Dave Cockrum created an amphibious heroine named Silkie, and then retracted the character when he couldn’t negotiate to retain partial ownership. He had a whole group of new heroes, he said—but they’d remain his now.

    — 2 years ago with 73 notes
    #x-men  #claremont  #cockrum  #dark phoenix  #days of future past  #englehart  #roy thomas  #diana schutz  #futurians  #silkie  #man-thing  #spider-woman  #dazzler  #doctor doom  #berkeley  #comix 
    1. mysilvinho reblogged this from charactermodel
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    5. defineprog reblogged this from charactermodel and added:
      I would love to have seen what could have been, if Marvel wasn’t such assholes to its creators.
    6. roborange reblogged this from charactermodel
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    10. charactermodel reblogged this from seanhowe and added:
      By and large, the X-MEN stories in the year following the “Dark Phoenix Saga” and “Days of Future Past” had paled in...
    11. dirtyriver reblogged this from seanhowe
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    13. invisiblelad reblogged this from themarvelageofcomics and added:
      I would love to see what these other unused characters looked like.
    14. oncomics reblogged this from themarvelageofcomics and added:
      Cockrum, to me, was one of the most creative talents. Unlike Kirby, his creativity was criminally under-used. I believe...