THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


Go to SEANHOWE.COM to purchase a copy of the book, now in paperback, or to read a chapter for free ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    Alternate U. Spring 1970 Course Catalog.
    Scheduling conflicts expected.

    — 20 hours ago with 1 note
    #alternate u.  #new york rat  #underground press  #radical politics  #no marvel content 

    Jonathan Hertzberg does it again.

    "Preshow reel for the 9/11/14 showing of John Guillermin’s KING KONG (1976) at the Nitehawk Cinema for the monthly DEUCE Film Series. Scenes depicting the Twin Towers on film are interspersed with shots of ’70s / ’80s Times Square and 42nd St., specifically movie marquees. Look closely at the movies listed on the marquees."

    — 23 hours ago with 5 notes

    Jim Steranko news clipping, 1954.

    — 1 day ago with 43 notes
    #jim steranko 
    Variety review of Marvel Super-Heroes animated series, October 26, 1966.

    Variety review of Marvel Super-Heroes animated series, October 26, 1966.

    — 1 day ago with 42 notes
    #marvel super-heroes 
    Patti Smith reviews Television at CBGB, 1974: “Robbing you over and over like sex.”Escapees from HeavenPatti SmithSoho Weekly NewsJune 27, 1974
Somewhere in the fifties Billy Lee Riley was slicking brill creme and boys all over the U.S.A. were resting Les Pauls on their hip and scrubbing them like sex. It eats thru the Chez Vous Ballroom 13 Floor Elevator Love Velvet Underground and the Yardbirds live in Persia. It permeates back seats waterfronts the local poolhall traintracks just anywhere that rains adolescents. And for the past six weeks it peaked after midnight every sunday on the bowerie in a dark little soho bar called C.B.G.B. Lousy P.A., long nervous dogs running random, women smoking french cigarettes and mostly boys on the prowl hanging by a thread waiting for Television to tune up. The tune up is their first number. Like a moslem the boys take their time to tune and they don’t apologize. These boys got real short hair totally naked faces and the lead Tom Verlaine has the most beautiful neck in rock ‘n’ roll. Real swan like. The kind of neck you want to strangle. He strolls up to the mike and drawls, “gotta Count Five number for ya” takes a swan dive and the boys launch into Psychotic Reaction. The music is rigidly maniac. A few non-believers murmur that they look like escapees from some mental ward but those tuned into TV know better. These boys are truly escapees from heaven. Television’s wings are a little twisted but the way they play is nearly perfect. Creating infinite space. Throbbing you over and over like sex. And sexy sexy as hell with songs like Hard on love, One on top of another and Love comes in spurts. Confused sexual energy makes young guys so desirable. Their careless way of dressing; their strange way of walking; filled with so much longing. Just relentlessly adolescent. Television is all boy. Richard Lloyd, who trades leads with Verlaine, is fresh and pouty. He sings like Arthur Lee with a stomach ache. The one seeming to suffer the most pain. He plays highly emotional fragile and angry. He also spends a lot of time keeping Richard Hell in tune. Hell raises it. He’s real neat, totally Highway 61. Tufted hair perfect shades and a grey-blue gabardine suit reputed to have graced the frame of Raymond Chandler. The way he moves is so insane like a spastic Chuck Berry like as if he strangest spade was doing the split on desolation row. His bass is total trash. A metallic gold fleck piece of shit he got in some pawnshop for $4. He has a driving monotonous way of playing it that comes on real sexy. He’s also a real fast mouth spits those jokes from the spleen and keeps them coming. Billy Ficca keeps the rhythm always smiling and dreaming. He reminds me of Charlie Watts the way he sits behind the band noncommittal sort of glazed over in his own world just drumming while the other guys are pumping their guitars in furious pursuit of the ultimate orgasm. He has an intricate style best described as psychotic calypso. If he loses his rythumn he invents another one. That way he never makes mistakes he just telescopes. The thing I like about this group is their hunger their desire the way they just get on stage and do it. Immediate tight no flash theatrics. Tom breaks a string he fixes it no apology. Lloyd’s strap slips but he beats into that guitar as it drags to the floor. If Hell loses balance he’ll lay out and play bass flat on his back. No hesitation. Wrong note so what. Television is ascending. Sometimes they drive you crazy cause they get out of time yet so close to persian. But they are worth all temperance cause when they hit it you get shot with light you never felt. They transcend every obstacle and heartache and bad night. Someone said one sunday around 3 a.m. closing time these boys are crazy; they are just too insane but me, I heard this funny flapping of wings, and the wild boys the wild boys the wild boys… just smiled. They’re ascending July 3 to Club 82; July 16 at Max’s Kansas City.

    Patti Smith reviews Television at CBGB, 1974: “Robbing you over and over like sex.”

    Escapees from Heaven
    Patti Smith
    Soho Weekly News
    June 27, 1974

    Somewhere in the fifties Billy Lee Riley was slicking brill creme and boys all over the U.S.A. were resting Les Pauls on their hip and scrubbing them like sex. It eats thru the Chez Vous Ballroom 13 Floor Elevator Love Velvet Underground and the Yardbirds live in Persia. It permeates back seats waterfronts the local poolhall traintracks just anywhere that rains adolescents. And for the past six weeks it peaked after midnight every sunday on the bowerie in a dark little soho bar called C.B.G.B. Lousy P.A., long nervous dogs running random, women smoking french cigarettes and mostly boys on the prowl hanging by a thread waiting for Television to tune up.

    The tune up is their first number. Like a moslem the boys take their time to tune and they don’t apologize. These boys got real short hair totally naked faces and the lead Tom Verlaine has the most beautiful neck in rock ‘n’ roll. Real swan like. The kind of neck you want to strangle. He strolls up to the mike and drawls, “gotta Count Five number for ya” takes a swan dive and the boys launch into Psychotic Reaction. The music is rigidly maniac. A few non-believers murmur that they look like escapees from some mental ward but those tuned into TV know better. These boys are truly escapees from heaven.

    Television’s wings are a little twisted but the way they play is nearly perfect. Creating infinite space. Throbbing you over and over like sex. And sexy sexy as hell with songs like Hard on love, One on top of another and Love comes in spurts. Confused sexual energy makes young guys so desirable. Their careless way of dressing; their strange way of walking; filled with so much longing. Just relentlessly adolescent.

    Television is all boy. Richard Lloyd, who trades leads with Verlaine, is fresh and pouty. He sings like Arthur Lee with a stomach ache. The one seeming to suffer the most pain. He plays highly emotional fragile and angry. He also spends a lot of time keeping Richard Hell in tune.

    Hell raises it. He’s real neat, totally Highway 61. Tufted hair perfect shades and a grey-blue gabardine suit reputed to have graced the frame of Raymond Chandler. The way he moves is so insane like a spastic Chuck Berry like as if he strangest spade was doing the split on desolation row. His bass is total trash. A metallic gold fleck piece of shit he got in some pawnshop for $4. He has a driving monotonous way of playing it that comes on real sexy. He’s also a real fast mouth spits those jokes from the spleen and keeps them coming.

    Billy Ficca keeps the rhythm always smiling and dreaming. He reminds me of Charlie Watts the way he sits behind the band noncommittal sort of glazed over in his own world just drumming while the other guys are pumping their guitars in furious pursuit of the ultimate orgasm. He has an intricate style best described as psychotic calypso. If he loses his rythumn he invents another one. That way he never makes mistakes he just telescopes.

    The thing I like about this group is their hunger their desire the way they just get on stage and do it. Immediate tight no flash theatrics. Tom breaks a string he fixes it no apology. Lloyd’s strap slips but he beats into that guitar as it drags to the floor. If Hell loses balance he’ll lay out and play bass flat on his back. No hesitation. Wrong note so what.

    Television is ascending. Sometimes they drive you crazy cause they get out of time yet so close to persian. But they are worth all temperance cause when they hit it you get shot with light you never felt. They transcend every obstacle and heartache and bad night. Someone said one sunday around 3 a.m. closing time these boys are crazy; they are just too insane but me, I heard this funny flapping of wings, and the wild boys the wild boys the wild boys… just smiled. They’re ascending July 3 to Club 82; July 16 at Max’s Kansas City.

    — 2 days ago with 21 notes
    #television  #patti smith  #c.b.g.b.  #tom verlaine  #richard hell  #richard lloyd  #billy ficca 
    T.K. Forcade, born this day in 1945.

    T.K. Forcade, born this day in 1945.

    — 4 days ago with 2 notes
    Stan Lee for Hathaway shirts.

    Stan Lee for Hathaway shirts.


    — 6 days ago with 83 notes
    #stan lee 
    Peter Falk, Angelo Grisanti, and John Cassavetes on the set of A Woman Under the Influence.

    Peter Falk, Angelo Grisanti, and John Cassavetes on the set of A Woman Under the Influence.

    — 6 days ago with 19 notes
    #peter falk  #angelo grisanti  #john cassavetes  #a woman under the influence 
    Tompkins Square Park, 1967From the East Village Other, Vol. 2, No. 17.

    Tompkins Square Park, 1967
    From the East Village Other, Vol. 2, No. 17.

    — 6 days ago with 5 notes
    #dana beal  #tompkins square park  #east village other  #evo  #provos 
    seanhowe:

Oh, that’s just Archie Goodwin as Dark Phoenix.

    seanhowe:

    Oh, that’s just Archie Goodwin as Dark Phoenix.

    — 1 week ago with 45 notes
    #archie goodwin  #dark phoenix 
    seanhowe:

Archie Goodwin and P. Craig Russell, 1980. Photo by Eliot R. Brown.

    seanhowe:

    Archie Goodwin and P. Craig Russell, 1980. Photo by Eliot R. Brown.

    — 1 week ago with 89 notes
    #archie goodwin  #P. Craig Russell  #Eliot R. Brown 
    colsmi:

The late & much-missed Archie Goodwin was born today in 1937. Above is Walt Simonson’s tribute to his friend and colleague, appropriating Goodwin’s own cartooning style to show just some of his many successes. (Scan from 2006’s Modern Masters Volume Eight.)

    colsmi:

    The late & much-missed Archie Goodwin was born today in 1937. Above is Walt Simonson’s tribute to his friend and colleague, appropriating Goodwin’s own cartooning style to show just some of his many successes. (Scan from 2006’s Modern Masters Volume Eight.)

    — 1 week ago with 28 notes
    #archie goodwin  #Walter Simonson