THE UNTOLD STORY

Go ahead, ask a question.   Images are an online-only supplement to the book MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY (plus occasional unrelated arcana )
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"A WILD-RIDE ACCOUNT" —The Hollywood Reporter
"EPIC" —The New York Times
"INDISPENSABLE" —Los Angeles Times
"DEFINITIVE" —The Wall Street Journal
"SCINTILLATING" —Publishers Weekly
"AUTHORITATIVE" —Kirkus Reviews
"GRIPPING" —Rolling Stone
"PRICELESS" —Booklist
"ESSENTIAL" —The Daily Beast
"REVELATORY" —The Miami Herald
"AS FULL OF COLORFUL CHARACTERS, TRAGIC REVERSALS AND UNLIKELY PLOT TWISTS AS ANY BOOK IN THE MARVEL CANON" —Newsday

twitter.com/seanhowe:

    From Superworld Comics #3, August 1940.

    From Superworld Comics #3, August 1940.

    — 3 days ago with 19 notes
    #superworld  #captain amazing  #color 
    Original art by Frank Miller, for the cover of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns #2, 1986. This was also the image on the shirt Miller was wearing when we first met to speak for the story in the September issue of Wired.

    Original art by Frank Miller, for the cover of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns #2, 1986.

    This was also the image on the shirt Miller was wearing when we first met to speak for the story in the September issue of Wired.

    — 5 days ago with 396 notes
    #frank miller  #batman: the dark knight returns  #batman  #dark knight  #original art 

    Panel and detail from page 2 of Wolverine #1 (1982).

    Art by Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein. Words by Chris Claremont. Lettering by Tom Orzechowski.

    — 1 week ago with 75 notes
    #wolverine  #frank miller  #Joe Rubinstein  #chris claremont  #Tom Orzechowski 

    Wanted: Hip Cops (1969)

    — 1 week ago with 44 notes
    Joan Didion’s “The White Album” in New West, 1979.

    Joan Didion’s “The White Album” in New West, 1979.

    — 1 week ago with 8 notes
    #joan didion  #new west 
    Jack Kirby At Home
In FANTASTIC FOUR #10, Doctor Doom visited “the studio of Kirby and Lee, on Madison Avenue,” crashing a plotting session and knocking the two out with sleeping gas. In reality, Kirby only came into the offices about once a week. He worked from a varnished-pine room in the basement of his Long Island home, with a bookshelf of Shakespeare and science fiction for inspiration and a ten-inch black-and-white television for company—and the door shut, to keep the cigar smoke from billowing out to the rest of the house. His name certainly wasn’t on any Madison Avenue door. “That was a lot of stuff that Stan Lee put into magazines, but the artists were all over the island,” Iron Man artist Don Heck told an interviewer. “I could go into the office two times this week, and somebody else could go in two other times…you just don’t cross paths.”
Text from MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY

    Jack Kirby At Home

    In FANTASTIC FOUR #10, Doctor Doom visited “the studio of Kirby and Lee, on Madison Avenue,” crashing a plotting session and knocking the two out with sleeping gas. In reality, Kirby only came into the offices about once a week. He worked from a varnished-pine room in the basement of his Long Island home, with a bookshelf of Shakespeare and science fiction for inspiration and a ten-inch black-and-white television for company—and the door shut, to keep the cigar smoke from billowing out to the rest of the house. His name certainly wasn’t on any Madison Avenue door. “That was a lot of stuff that Stan Lee put into magazines, but the artists were all over the island,” Iron Man artist Don Heck told an interviewer. “I could go into the office two times this week, and somebody else could go in two other times…you just don’t cross paths.”


    Text from MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY

    (Source: seanhowe)

    — 1 week ago with 319 notes
    #jack kirby  #excerpts 
    jthenr-comics-vault:

MARVEL Program for the 1966 New York Comic-Con Art by Jack Kirby

    jthenr-comics-vault:

    MARVEL Program for the 1966 New York Comic-Con 
    Art by Jack Kirby

    (Source: thecomicsvault, via guttersnipercomics)

    — 1 week ago with 391 notes
    #Jack Kirby 
    Stan Winston models for the Howard the Duck movie.

    Stan Winston models for the Howard the Duck movie.

    — 1 week ago with 227 notes
    #stan winston  #howard the duck  #steve gerber 
    Ad for ALL-NEGRO COMICS #1, 1947.You can download the entire comic for free via the invaluable Digital Comic Museum.

    Ad for ALL-NEGRO COMICS #1, 1947.

    You can download the entire comic for free via the invaluable Digital Comic Museum.

    — 1 week ago with 256 notes
    #all-negro comics  #orrin c. evans 
    Frank Miller sneaks Elektra into SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR, 1993. Will she make it into the movie adaptation?

    Frank Miller sneaks Elektra into SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR, 1993. Will she make it into the movie adaptation?

    — 1 week ago with 22 notes
    #frank miller  #sin city  #elektra  #sin city: a dame to kill for 

    "Do you dare enter…THE HOUSE OF IDEAS?"

    Image: Frank Miller digs up the bones of Elektra, 1997.

    Text: From Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, page 351. The Miller quote comes from an interview Thom Carnell conducted in 1994, which was published in Carpe Noctem #2.


    — 1 week ago with 61 notes
    #frank miller  #elektra  #sin city  #jack kirby  #daredevil 
    burnedshoes:

© William Claxton, 1960, Donald Byrd in subway, NYC
Jazz Seen - The Life and Times of Photographer William Claxton is a documentary about West Coast jazz. No one has documented the jazz scene and its fascinating entourage more strikingly than photographer William Claxton. The film evokes forty years of American pop culture by telling the extraordinary career of the perhaps most famous jazz photographer of the world: A film like a journey from the past to the presence.

    burnedshoes:

    © William Claxton, 1960, Donald Byrd in subway, NYC

    Jazz Seen - The Life and Times of Photographer William Claxton is a documentary about West Coast jazz. No one has documented the jazz scene and its fascinating entourage more strikingly than photographer William Claxton. The film evokes forty years of American pop culture by telling the extraordinary career of the perhaps most famous jazz photographer of the world: A film like a journey from the past to the presence.

    — 1 week ago with 105 notes